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Sometimes, entry-level jobs get a bad reputation.

Think about it -- what do you think of when you hear about an "entry-level" position? Some phrases that come to mind could include "low-paying" or "low man on the totem pole."

These common stereotypes of entry-level jobs can hinder people from going after amazing opportunities, especially since there are incredible entry-level gigs out there that offer great salaries, benefits, and opportunities for growth.

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We've all heard of a midlife crisis, but did you know a quarter-life crisis is just as real? Many college graduates and young professionals struggle after school and in the workplace for this reason.

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“The time has come,” the walrus said, “to get a job.” Transitioning from college to career can be difficult for some. But if they’re prepared, new graduates can make that transition a little easier for themselves. So, what do recent grads need to know going into the workforce? According to career expert J.T. O’Donnell, a lot of employers are skeptical about hiring recent grads due to their lack of experience. But what can grads to do overcome this common challenge? If you want to stand out and prove your value to employers, you have to show that you’re resourceful. “They’re looking for young professionals who can prove that they can hold themselves accountable, that they can manage themselves, that they can figure out problems for themselves, that they can seek answers on their own, that they can get work done without a lot of hand-holding and instruction,” said O’Donnell. “They’re looking for real independent self-starters.” But how can you convey this to employers as a recent grad? According to O’Donnell, the best thing you can do is to share examples of times in your life when you took initiative during job interviews. When were you able to step up, take care of business, and get things done without a lot of help? Those are examples you need to share. “When you can prove that to employers, you’re proving that you’ll truly be resourceful on the job and they’re not going to have to do all of that extra hand-holding,” said O’Donnell.

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We've got some bad news for you, college grads. That diploma you've worked so hard to get isn't worth as much as you might think. In fact, your college degree doesn't matter to employers (in a lot of cases). Here's why... While they are required in certain fields, college degrees have become sort of a prerequisite for jobs. That means, more people are attending college. As a result, there's a LOT of competition out there when it comes to finding your first job after college. So, your shiny college degree doesn't set you apart from the thousands of other graduates just like you. But what can? According to career expert J.T. O'Donnell, your aptitude and personality can really help to set you apart from all of these other recent grads. Your aptitude is your natural ability to do something. What unique strengths can you bring to an organization? How can they add value? Your personality is also an important factor here. How do you interact with people? How do you connect with them? Your personality can really set you apart from other candidates if you're a good culture fit at an organization, so don't be afraid to let the real you shine. "When you can display great attributes with your aptitude and your personality, you are going to stand out to employer because EVERYBODY has a college degree," said O'Donnell. Plus, most recent graduates don't have a ton of experience to offer employers. As a result, the only things they can differentiate you on are your aptitude and personality. Remember, in most cases, your college degree doesn't' matter to employers. Get clear on your strengths and character traits so you can show your value to employers.

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