A+A+O = 3 Elements to Hanging on to Your Job

By Johnathan Flanagan


In past recessions, many companies were hesitant to lay off white-collar or specialized workers, the prevailing wisdom being the vacancies these layoffs created would hamper corporate growth once economic times were less dismal. But many companies are willing to take that risk today, because laying off employees is one of the most direct ways of slashing costs.Very few people are safe these days.

Now, every cloud has its silver lining. (i.e. Survivors of a layoff usually find after a workforce purge the path to the top suddenly becomes more direct.) While it is true there’s no foolproof way to avoid a layoff, if you follow these simple tips you’ll hopefully wind up in a corner office rather than the unemployment bureau.

Appearance

When the powers-that-be are making the decision as to who stays and who goes, the smallest details can sometimes make a difference.Appearance is a good example; little things like dressing up a bit and keeping a neat desk or work area can make a difference in your co-workers’ perception of you.This might seem like a rather obvious point, but a lot of people put this by the wayside.This is especially true in more casual work environments, as some people can take a loose dress code to the extreme by sporting a ratty sweatshirt or torn jeans.The same goes for people who keep a cluttered desk or slouch in their office chair; it can give off the impression that you are a slacker, even if you are not.

Attitude

Of course a caustic work attitude is not going to help anyone’s case but less obvious is the question of how visible you should be in the workplace.There are two schools of thought here.One is that being more outgoing is best since it projects confidence and leadership.The other is that taking a low-key, introverted approach is the better way to go, because it gives off the impression you are hard-working and dedicated.To be truthful, both of these approaches have their merits, but in the end it is best to tailor your work attitude to your personality and to always have a positive demeanor. Avoid being nervous and paranoid.

Organizational Skills

This is perhaps the most important trait.In times like this it is important to buckle down and get work done. When it comes down to it, your output is what you’ll be judged on the most.This also means being organized so as to increase efficiency and to keep ahead of the workload.It’s at times like this that a work email application, such as Microsoft Outlook, can be your best friend.Try setting alerts and appointment dates around deadlines and tasks-to-be-done.Automatic reminders can work especially well if you have a lot of work to juggle, as people tend to be more prone to be forgetful if they have a lot on their plate.

In these sink-or-swim times, the difference between a promotion and a pink slip can come down to luck, circumstances, and other factors outside of your control.But if you follow the tips outlined above, you could increase your own odds of survival.

If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the awkward situation one of our viewers, Diane submitted. She has recently worked with a co-worker on a group project. When it came time to present the project at a meeting, Diane let her co-worker present. While it went great, the co-worker proceed to take credit for nearly all of Diane's work. Frustrating to say the least!

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In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if your co-worker took credit for the work you did...right in front of your colleagues AND boss!

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

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If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the awkward situation one of our viewers, Cam submitted. He's been working at a job for awhile, but recently overheard a hiring manager making fun of a candidate with autism right after an interview-not only awkward, but VERY unprofessional!

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In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if witnessed a hiring manager at your organization making fun of a candidate who they had just interviewed who had autism.

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

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Starting a family is one of the biggest milestones in a person's life. It's in those first few months when a parent can really bond with their newborn and make lifelong memories. However, for some new dads, it can be difficult to juggle being a new parent while remaining dedicated to their career.

Fortunately, some companies have generous paternity leave policies that give new dads the ability to take time off of work to stay home with their child.

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There are LOTS of questions around resume dos and don'ts. There's so much advice out there that it can be overwhelming to try and figure out what's the correct answer.

During our weekly live Office Hours on YouTube, two of our coaches, Ariella Coombs and J.T. O'Donnell, answer questions live from viewers related to their job search, career success, on the job situations and more.

We complied a simple list of what we find to be the most common questions our coaches get about resumes. We hope you find this helpful.

Let's start with the basics...

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