ATTN: Read The Labels Before You Drink The Career Advice

By J.T. O'Donnell With the creation of blogs has come a wonderful opportunity for people to become better informed on a variety of topics. Just visit www.Alltop.com and you'll find a 'magazine rack effect' of blogs on almost any subject you can think of. In fact, when you click on the careers tab, you'll find plenty of content providing advice. However, not all of it is worth taking. Blog readers beware! Some online writers aren't giving accurate or sound advice. Here's why... As more blogs are created, it gets harder for sites to increase readership. So, the need to stand out becomes critical. It starts with crafting intriguing titles for their posts so they can capture a reader's attention and get that all-important 'click' on to the site. But, when that doesn't result in enough hits, a blogger may opt to go beyond the headline and into the body of text with advice and commentary meant to shock and gain attention. There's an old saying, "any publicity is good publicity," and many bloggers today are embracing that strategy. They believe that creating a buzz is more important than creating a valuable resource. Sadly, the result is a lot of bloggers offering insights that are more than just a little off-base. So, how does an innocent reader do a litmus test to make sure what they are reading is viable advice? A few suggestions: 1) Confirm the author can back up their advice with reputable facts. A single success is an accident. 2-5 times could still be just luck. But, an ability to provide dozens of examples - now that's a fact. 2) Assess the credibility of the source. What's the writer's credentials? Should they be giving you advice on this subject? What qualifies them? 3) Follow your gut's BS meter. A simple but true test. If the advice flies in convention and makes you think, "Really? Why then aren't more people embracing it?" Leave it alone and let someone else try it first. When we reached out to the current career experts (all 15 of them!) donating their time to answer career questions from followers of the Twitter Advice Project (T.A.P. into CAREREALISM), we chose people with a wide range of experience. The key word in that phrase: experience. Better still, we chose a large number of experts to participate so those seeking advice could see the collective thoughts of the group on the subject. This enables us to offer advice consensus and deliver a comprehensive answer to each career question received. It's a known fact the IQ of a group is always higher than the average of its participants. So, it only made sense that we would create a career advice tool that would leverage the power of a team. In closing, I ask you this: At the end of the day, would you take medical advice from a team of doctors with PhDs and a successful track record of healing, or would you go with the Witch Doctor in the crazy outfit who just landed on the scene? It's your career, treat it well. Seek advice from credible sources to ensure you get the right advice. The health of your career is at stake.

If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the awkward situation one of our viewers, Diane submitted. She has recently worked with a co-worker on a group project. When it came time to present the project at a meeting, Diane let her co-worker present. While it went great, the co-worker proceed to take credit for nearly all of Diane's work. Frustrating to say the least!

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In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if your co-worker took credit for the work you did...right in front of your colleagues AND boss!

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

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If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the awkward situation one of our viewers, Cam submitted. He's been working at a job for awhile, but recently overheard a hiring manager making fun of a candidate with autism right after an interview-not only awkward, but VERY unprofessional!

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In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if witnessed a hiring manager at your organization making fun of a candidate who they had just interviewed who had autism.

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

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Starting a family is one of the biggest milestones in a person's life. It's in those first few months when a parent can really bond with their newborn and make lifelong memories. However, for some new dads, it can be difficult to juggle being a new parent while remaining dedicated to their career.

Fortunately, some companies have generous paternity leave policies that give new dads the ability to take time off of work to stay home with their child.

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There are LOTS of questions around resume dos and don'ts. There's so much advice out there that it can be overwhelming to try and figure out what's the correct answer.

During our weekly live Office Hours on YouTube, two of our coaches, Ariella Coombs and J.T. O'Donnell, answer questions live from viewers related to their job search, career success, on the job situations and more.

We complied a simple list of what we find to be the most common questions our coaches get about resumes. We hope you find this helpful.

Let's start with the basics...

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Back in March, we made the hard decision to change our private Facebook group of over 37 THOUSAND members to a fee-based only platform.

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In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if a recruiter called you a day EARLY for your phone interview (and you were NOT PREPARED!)

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

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