Building a Career Back-up Plan: Employment Trend for 2012

According to the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics here is a list of the top 10 Fastest Growing Occupations in the United States today:
  1. Biomedical Engineers
  2. Network Systems and Data Communications Analysts
  3. Home Health Aides
  4. Personal and Home Care Aides
  5. Financial Examiners
  6. Medical Scientists
  7. Physician Assistants
  8. Skin Care Specialists
  9. Biochemists and biophysicists
  10. Athletic Trainers
This is where the jobs are. The question for anyone who is career oriented is how do you capitalize on this data? Notice the list above falls roughly into two groups, the glamorous group consisting of biochemists, network systems analysts, and the ordinary group. What is surprising is only two groups on this list require a Doctoral degree (medical scientists and biochemists). This means the rest of the list is accessible to almost anyone who has a desire to pursue continued education or training. According to Paul Saffo, a futures analyst for the Institute of the Future in California, lifelong learning is the ticket to long-term career success.

Ordinary Jobs vs. Glamorous Jobs

What is striking to anyone who knows much about science is that the ordinary jobs are often more glamorous than the “glamorous jobs.” Scientists work very long hours and many of them haven’t left a lab in years. Image you have a friend who is one of the leading genetics researchers in the country but he'd really prefer to be a chef. If he didn’t have a large family to support no doubt he would happily spend his days frying onions and cutting up vegetables. Right? Ask yourself who has the better job, the skin care specialist who listens to soft soothing music all day or a financial examiner? In addition, ordinary jobs can often pay very well. With baby boomers retiring from jobs as mechanics, machinists and administrators at a quick clip these jobs are going to continue to be in demand and salaries will rise accordingly.

Back-up Plan Employment and Training

If 2008-2010 has taught employees anything it is they need to have a back-up plan. Above is the list of back-up plans you can start as your New Year’s resolution. There are several more ideas over at Bureau of Labor Statistics. Incredibly pursuing education and even a part-time secondary job is more liberating than it is tiring. People tend to pursue continuing education in fields they are interested in and in many cases better suited for than their current job or occupation. As careers mature people realize things like workplace environments, office etiquette and contributions to society all contribute to job satisfaction. In addition, the exposure to other working individuals who are doing the same thing opens up business opportunities and new friendships. The best part of pursuing a back-up plan is that it can relieve a significant amount of anxiety and stress over being laid off from your current job. Not only will you know what you want to do if you are laid off, you will already be training for a new career. Ironically, career professionals that actively pursue back-up plans rarely are fired or laid off. The additional confidence combined with enhanced skills and a broader view of life makes for a great attitude. Moreover, time management skills and discipline are needed to pursue a back-up plan while working full-time. These skills are often then transferred to the workplace leading to greater efficiency. If you haven’t considered a back-up plan, now may be the time to start. Without exception every individual I know who received a promotion this year also had a back-up plan. Get started yourself and make your life better and your career more prosperous. Aveta’s Six Sigma offers the best self-paced online certifications in Six Sigma Yellow Belt, Green Belt, Black Belt, Lean Six Sigma and DFSS. Six Sigma training encourages individuals to stop what they are doing, examine how well they have done it, and then implement improvements to iron out defects. Career plan idea dice image from Shutterstock

If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the awkward situation one of our viewers, Diane submitted. She has recently worked with a co-worker on a group project. When it came time to present the project at a meeting, Diane let her co-worker present. While it went great, the co-worker proceed to take credit for nearly all of Diane's work. Frustrating to say the least!

SHOW MORE Show less

In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if your co-worker took credit for the work you did...right in front of your colleagues AND boss!

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

SHOW MORE Show less

If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the awkward situation one of our viewers, Cam submitted. He's been working at a job for awhile, but recently overheard a hiring manager making fun of a candidate with autism right after an interview-not only awkward, but VERY unprofessional!

SHOW MORE Show less

In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if witnessed a hiring manager at your organization making fun of a candidate who they had just interviewed who had autism.

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

SHOW MORE Show less

Starting a family is one of the biggest milestones in a person's life. It's in those first few months when a parent can really bond with their newborn and make lifelong memories. However, for some new dads, it can be difficult to juggle being a new parent while remaining dedicated to their career.

Fortunately, some companies have generous paternity leave policies that give new dads the ability to take time off of work to stay home with their child.

SHOW MORE Show less

There are LOTS of questions around resume dos and don'ts. There's so much advice out there that it can be overwhelming to try and figure out what's the correct answer.

During our weekly live Office Hours on YouTube, two of our coaches, Ariella Coombs and J.T. O'Donnell, answer questions live from viewers related to their job search, career success, on the job situations and more.

We complied a simple list of what we find to be the most common questions our coaches get about resumes. We hope you find this helpful.

Let's start with the basics...

SHOW MORE Show less