How To Become A Dentist

Being a dentist can be a highly challenging yet rewarding profession. This rapidly changing field offers prestige, leadership, flexibility, and financial security but requires hard work and determination to earn them. In this article, we will break down some of the main considerations when learning how to become a dentist. How do I know if I want to be a dentist? You must become familiar with the profession and share in in the dentistry experience to be sure. Volunteer at a local practice or interview a dentist to learn what motivated them to choose dentistry and learn about their work life. Also, examine yourself. Do your traits and interests match those that achieve personal satisfaction and career success as a dentist? What kinds of traits or interests do dentists typically have? Specific traits that are commonly found in dentists include manual dexterity, diligence, excellent communications, and interpersonal skills, adaptable to frequent change, a craving to be challenged, an appreciation for diversity, patience, and creativity both scientifically and artistically. Dentists also tend to have a passion for the sciences, a fascination and aptitude for new technology, and enjoy helping people. What do I do to once I decide I want to become a dentist? High level guidelines for students to consider are listed here; however, the American Dental Association (ADA) guides aspiring students through the dental school admissions process at a more detailed level. High school students should take algebra, biology, and chemistry classes; talk to a guidance counselor to find and apply to colleges that have a two-year pre-dental program with a heavy emphasis on the sciences; and maintain a high grade point average. College students should plan coursework to include the prerequisite science courses necessary to get into dental school including biology and chemistry classes; participate in dentistry internship or volunteer programs; research four-year dental schools accredited by the ADA Commission on Dental Accreditation; be familiar with admission requirements; and prepare for and take the Dental Admissions Test (DAT). What about dental school? Acceptance into dental school will be based upon a combination of overall grade point average, performance in science classes, DAT scores, interviews, and recommendations. Once accepted into the four-year program, the first two years will be primarily laboratory and classroom studies while the final years are mostly clinical working side-by-side with dentists. The work done in dental school prepares students for the written and practical state exams necessary to obtain a license to practice. To obtain a dental specialty, an additional 2-4 years of schooling would be required. What will my life be like as a dentist? Once licensed, dentists can open their own private practice, join an existing practice, teach, do research, work in a hospital emergency room, or serve in public health or administration. Dentists working in a practice typically work five days a week for 7-10 hours/day (not including emergencies) and live comfortably with a median income of $142,000. Dentists also typically enjoy flexibility to maintain a balanced work/personal life, especially when they own their own practice. How become dentist image from Bigstock

When most people think of Nike, they think of shoes, retail stores, and, of course, athletes. That's all true, but there's more. Behind Nike's walls, you'll find the doers and thinkers who design, create, and innovate every day. There are also data scientists who discover and leverage athlete insights to create the future of sport.

You might be surprised to learn about the impact you can have in Data & Analytics at Nike versus at a major tech giant. Nike employees get to work on a wide array of challenges, so if you're obsessed with math, science, computers, and/or data, and you love sport, these stories may inspire you to work at Nike.

SHOW MORE Show less

Employee loyalty is something every company longs for. It's estimated employee turnover costs as much as 130-200% of an employee's salary. When a talented, knowledgeable, trained employee leaves, it's bad for business. And, when lots of them leave, it can be the kiss of death.

SHOW MORE Show less

If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the interview situation one of our viewers, Remi submitted. He was in an interview and was asked the question: How many cows are there in Canada right now? - What a weird question but this is a technique that some hiring managers are using these days.

SHOW MORE Show less

If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the awkward situation one of our viewers, Kevin submitted. He is a college student who's working a part time job to make ends meet. The manager/owner of the company has become a micro-manager who watches him work on camera and reads his company emails. A bit over the top wouldn't you say?

SHOW MORE Show less