3 Ways To Snatch A Job With LinkedIn
Have you noticed the zillions are articles written about the virtues of LinkedIn and necessity of you getting on board in order to have a successful job hunt? Social media permeates our society, and LinkedIn has become the most fertile hunting ground for talent for recruiters and businesses of all sizes. The buzz about LinkedIn does point to something real, but it often doesn’t clarify, beyond “help you get a job,” the three basic ways this business social media site can help you do just that. Put in simplest terms, you should use LinkedIn in such a way as to: 1. Make you findable by companies and recruiters looking for someone with your talents and experience. 2. Enable you to find employment opportunities worth pursuing. 3. Help you learn what you need to know about the “latest and greatest” in your field, about companies you want to work for and the people who already work there, especially including the people you want to hire you... and much, much more. My latest article in U.S. News & World Report covers these three things and gives specific tips about how to do them. Read Full Article Happy hunting! Photo Credit: Shutterstock
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