You'll Never Get a Job

I’m sure when you read the title of this email you thought, “What?! Is she serious? That’s terrible! Why would J.T. say that?” – at least I’m hoping that was your reaction! Now, I want you to imagine you are standing in front of someone supremely confident. A person who outwardly appears they have their act together. They smile at you and say, “You will NEVER get a job because you are...” Then, fill in the rest of the sentence with every negative thing you say to yourself about why you haven’t found a new job yet. How does that make you feel? I hope it makes you angry. I hope you imagine yourself responding by saying, “Who are YOU to say I will never get a job,” because that’s the reaction you should be having. Why? Because nobody, absolutely NOBODY has the right to define the ending to your career story…including you. And sadly, the person most likely doing this very thing to you is the person you look at in the mirror. Here’s why... We are our own worst critics. Especially, when we are failing to achieve something we are working on that we see as vital to our happiness. And let’s face it - nothing is more important to us than being able to say with pride and satisfaction what we do for a living. We are obsessed with doing work we think others will respect. That’s why we are so darn hard on ourselves when we can’t find that ideal position. It’s time to stand up to your inner naysayer! In all the years I’ve been coaching, I know one thing to be true: the ability to find career satisfaction on our own terms (even in the worst economy!) lies within us. We have to believe we deserve to find this satisfaction. We also have to let go of the toxic concept of finding work that impresses others. Don’t believe me? Then just ask any person you know who likes their work, and more importantly, likes themselves. They’ll tell you it comes down to the stories they tell in their heads. They like the work they do. They derive happiness from it, regardless of what it pays, what the title is, or what others think of it. NOTE: If you don’t have at least four people in your life you admire for being truly satisfied with their career choice, then you need to start networking. Surrounding yourself with people who have this type of happiness is vital to teaching you how to find the same. This week, ask yourself, "Am I guilty of denying myself the career success and satisfaction I want?" If so, then it’s time to start working through this crisis of confidence. If you're a CareerHMO.com member, I encourage you to e-mail me and share your true fears. Own up to being too hard on yourself. Let’s talk through and re-write the script in your head. I promise, as soon as you start changing this mindset, the sooner we’ll start to see opportunities for you to grow professionally. J.T. O’Donnell is founder and CEO of CAREEREALISM.com and CareerHMO.com. Image from Gunnar Pippel/Shutterstock

If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the awkward situation one of our viewers, Diane submitted. She has recently worked with a co-worker on a group project. When it came time to present the project at a meeting, Diane let her co-worker present. While it went great, the co-worker proceed to take credit for nearly all of Diane's work. Frustrating to say the least!

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In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if your co-worker took credit for the work you did...right in front of your colleagues AND boss!

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

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If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the awkward situation one of our viewers, Cam submitted. He's been working at a job for awhile, but recently overheard a hiring manager making fun of a candidate with autism right after an interview-not only awkward, but VERY unprofessional!

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In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if witnessed a hiring manager at your organization making fun of a candidate who they had just interviewed who had autism.

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

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Starting a family is one of the biggest milestones in a person's life. It's in those first few months when a parent can really bond with their newborn and make lifelong memories. However, for some new dads, it can be difficult to juggle being a new parent while remaining dedicated to their career.

Fortunately, some companies have generous paternity leave policies that give new dads the ability to take time off of work to stay home with their child.

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There are LOTS of questions around resume dos and don'ts. There's so much advice out there that it can be overwhelming to try and figure out what's the correct answer.

During our weekly live Office Hours on YouTube, two of our coaches, Ariella Coombs and J.T. O'Donnell, answer questions live from viewers related to their job search, career success, on the job situations and more.

We complied a simple list of what we find to be the most common questions our coaches get about resumes. We hope you find this helpful.

Let's start with the basics...

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