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Learn To Love Your Performance Review

Performance reviews get a bad rap in many organizations. They are often viewed as labor intensive or just a rote drill that is virtually meaningless to the employee and/or the manager. However, a performance review can be a valuable exercise for both the employee and the manager if it’s conducted effectively. Related: 5 Tips For Motivating Your Team If you follow these steps, you'll love your performance review, because it will be honest and actionable. If you’re the employee:


Talk To Your Manager About What To Expect

Your organization may require you to complete a self-assessment, so make sure you take care of your responsibilities before having the formal review with your manager.

Prepare For The Review

At a minimum, you should brainstorm (and possibly write down) your top accomplishments for the past year (or period of performance being evaluated). This will help your manager justify a salary increase if that’s being considered in conjunction with your review. It’s also a great time to map out your career path and any training or continuing education opportunities you wish to pursue in the near future.

Be Willing To Listen To Constructive Feedback

A performance review is for your benefit, so don’t become defensive if a manager suggests improvement in one or more areas. Listen to what the manager has to say, process the information and then respond appropriately. Your manager’s role is to guide you into becoming a better professional, so try not to take feedback as an assault on your character. If you’re the manager:

Find Dedicated Time To Meet With Your Employee

We all have lots of distractions, so if you can’t spend an uninterrupted hour in the office, consider meeting with your employee in an off-site location. The employee will appreciate your undivided attention and the performance evaluation process will be more meaningful to you both.

Set Expectations

Performance reviews don’t always go hand-in-hand with salary increases, so make sure your employee knows what this performance evaluation means and how the process works. If there’s a concern over poor performance, the employee should be notified of the steps he/she needs to take to improve.

Know It’s Not One And Done

Although the formal performance review may only occur every six months or year, you still need to provide your employees with ongoing feedback. Make an effort to give positive reinforcement for jobs well done, but also deal with performance problems as they arise. The best performance reviews have active participants, positive attitudes, a willingness to listen to each other, mutual goal setting and problem solving, as well as clear performance examples. This post was originally published at an earlier date.

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In this week's edition of Well,This Happened, the series that lets you become a career coach, we addressed James' tough situation.

James was caught off guard during a department heads meeting when he was asked to present. He wasn't prepared but did so anyway and bombed the presentation because of this. James is now wondering what he should do to address this situation.

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