(function() { var cookie = 'rebelmouse_abtests='; cookie += '; Max-Age=0'; document.cookie = cookie + '; Path=/; SameSite=None; Secure'; })();

Your resume should include professional awards you’ve received and your professional affiliations (for example, membership in an industry organization). Related: How To Cover Employment Gaps On Your Resume There is no such thing as an insignificant award or affiliation. Whether you stood out from a group of 100 or 10, you still stood out. Whether you showed up at meetings once a year or served as President for three years, whether you were recognized for your individual contribution or for your role in a team effort, you still showed active interest and success in your industry. Often professional awards can be listed under the company which gave you the award (“Best Sales Associate,” “President’s Club,” “Employee of the Month”). If your awards are industry-wide rather than company-specific, you may want to group them under a separate heading similar to that for your employment history. Affiliations can be listed at the end of the resume or in another location, depending on the resume or CV format and the branding for the resume. I have listed affiliations at the top of a resume when they were important to a client’s brand. You might title an awards/affiliations section as “Professional Development” or “Memberships” or “Awards and Affiliations,” depending on the content. This post was originally published at an earlier date.


Related Posts

How To Handle Career Gaps On Your Resume LinkedIn: What To Include In Your Work History How To Cover Employment Gaps On Your Resume Photo Credit: Shutterstock
Learn how to land a career you love

It's always a good thing to give back. Whether it's doing hands-on service with a group like Habitat for Humanity or assisting in the back office of a local non-profit, there are benefits beyond money that come from volunteering.

SHOW MORE Show less

"Always read the fine print." Isn't that what they say? It's a vicious, dog-eat-dog business world and, more often than not, it's the underdog who suffers. However, if that underdog is properly prepared and has a few tricks up his or her sleeve, the tables could be turned.

SHOW MORE Show less

Let's first take a look at how your core values can positively impact your brand.

SHOW MORE Show less

Latest