Resume

Your Resume: Professional Awards And Affiliations

Your Resume: Professional Awards And Affiliations

Your resume should include professional awards you’ve received and your professional affiliations (for example, membership in an industry organization). Related: How To Cover Employment Gaps On Your Resume There is no such thing as an insignificant award or affiliation. Whether you stood out from a group of 100 or 10, you still stood out. Whether you showed up at meetings once a year or served as President for three years, whether you were recognized for your individual contribution or for your role in a team effort, you still showed active interest and success in your industry. Often professional awards can be listed under the company which gave you the award (“Best Sales Associate,” “President’s Club,” “Employee of the Month”). If your awards are industry-wide rather than company-specific, you may want to group them under a separate heading similar to that for your employment history. Affiliations can be listed at the end of the resume or in another location, depending on the resume or CV format and the branding for the resume. I have listed affiliations at the top of a resume when they were important to a client’s brand. You might title an awards/affiliations section as “Professional Development” or “Memberships” or “Awards and Affiliations,” depending on the content. This post was originally published at an earlier date.


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