3 Tips For Maximizing Your Out-Of-State Resume

Trying to acquire an out-of-state job can be a bit more challenging than securing one in the state you’re in, simply because you are lacking certain advantages of in-state candidates. So, it will be up to you to show in your resume being out-of-state is not a hindrance. Related: Top 7 Resume Trends For 2015 Here’s how you can get started on your out-of-state resume:


1. Show That Relocating Isn’t A Problem

One concern a hiring manager might have regarding your applying for a job while out-of-state is that relocating could be a challenge. It’s a great idea to address this head on by noting on your resume that you’re ready to relocate. Also, in your cover letter, you can reiterate this and mention that you’re open to interviewing at any time in any location.

2. Prove You Can Adapt To The Area As Necessary

Another concern an employer could have is you might be unable to quickly adapt to the area to which you’d be moving. This is especially important if you will need to build local clientele for the company. Even if the concern isn’t listed in the job posting, it’s good for you to show you have a proven track record of hitting the ground running in all of the jobs you’ve worked—no matter where they were located. If the company needs to know that you can build connections, then mention in your resume you’ve done so already. Show you already have an expansive Rolodex and are eager to make new connections.

3. Make Your Out-Of-State Perspective Intriguing

The fact you’re out-of-state doesn’t have to be a hindrance. In fact, being from out of the area can bring a new and fresh perspective to the company, so be sure to sound “alive” in your resume. Show you’re eager to get started in a new environment and bring unique ideas to the table that you’ve acquired thanks to your current environment. Without directly saying being foreign to the area is better, you can still be intriguing enough to encourage them to want to know more about you. Of course, you want to cover the basics when writing your resume, including adding plenty of industry-related keywords, creating a great job target and career summary, and making sure there are absolutely no typos. But taking the extra step to show your out-of-state status isn’t a hindrance could make your resume stand out against your competition. This post was originally published at an earlier date.

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About the author

Jessica Holbrook Hernandez, CEO of Great Resumes Fast is an expert resume writer, career and personal branding strategist, author, and presenter. Want to work with the best resume writer? If you would like us to personally work on your resume, cover letter, or LinkedIn profile—and dramatically improve their response rates—then check out our professional and executive resume writing services at GreatResumesFast.com or contact us for more information if you have any questions. Disclosure: This post is sponsored by a CAREEREALISM-approved expert. You can learn more about expert posts here. Photo Credit: Shutterstock

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