Survey Says Men Bigger !@#$-Kissers To Bosses Than Women

By J.T. O'Donnell


Okay, did that title get your attention? I hope so. Here’s why…

My friends over at Randstad sent me a peek at the results of their Work Watch survey they just completed. It’s focused on how employees perceive their bosses andcompares employers’ management styles to presidential personality types. Lots of interesting stats are included, but honestly, there was one that really caught my eye. When asked the question,

“Have you changed your work style/habits based on your manager’s personality?”

61% of males asked said 'yes,' while only 49% of females said 'yes.' Hmmm. I immediately wondered: Why are men more likely to change then women? I posed the question to a good friend of mine and she responded with the following, “That’s easy. Because most of them have male bosses and the ‘old boy’s club’ mentality still exists. Have you seen the show Mad Men? Even though it’s set 50 years ago, a lot of it still rings true.”

I think she might be right. Women might not be as inclined to change their habits because they don’t feel the need to. We could even argue that the male boss/female employee work relationship is different than the male boss/male employee relationship. Perhaps, men feel the need to be accepted by a male boss even after they were hired, whereas women feel if they were hired by a male boss, then they are accepted. Or, maybe there is still pressure to 'be one of the guys' in a lot of workplaces for men, while women in the same environment are excluded from this practice.

What do you think? Why is there such a difference in this statistic? Would it be different if there were more female bosses? I’d be interested to know of the people surveyed, how many of them had male bosses.

Now tell us. Have you changed your work habits because of your manager’s personality? If so, are you glad you did?

If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the awkward situation one of our viewers, Diane submitted. She has recently worked with a co-worker on a group project. When it came time to present the project at a meeting, Diane let her co-worker present. While it went great, the co-worker proceed to take credit for nearly all of Diane's work. Frustrating to say the least!

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In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if your co-worker took credit for the work you did...right in front of your colleagues AND boss!

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

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If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the awkward situation one of our viewers, Cam submitted. He's been working at a job for awhile, but recently overheard a hiring manager making fun of a candidate with autism right after an interview-not only awkward, but VERY unprofessional!

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In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if witnessed a hiring manager at your organization making fun of a candidate who they had just interviewed who had autism.

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

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Starting a family is one of the biggest milestones in a person's life. It's in those first few months when a parent can really bond with their newborn and make lifelong memories. However, for some new dads, it can be difficult to juggle being a new parent while remaining dedicated to their career.

Fortunately, some companies have generous paternity leave policies that give new dads the ability to take time off of work to stay home with their child.

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There are LOTS of questions around resume dos and don'ts. There's so much advice out there that it can be overwhelming to try and figure out what's the correct answer.

During our weekly live Office Hours on YouTube, two of our coaches, Ariella Coombs and J.T. O'Donnell, answer questions live from viewers related to their job search, career success, on the job situations and more.

We complied a simple list of what we find to be the most common questions our coaches get about resumes. We hope you find this helpful.

Let's start with the basics...

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