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Can Your Recruiter Stop Your Unemployment?

Dear Experts, I've worked temporary for two years and became unemployed in late August. I built a good rapport with one of my temp agency recruiters, who'd offer me assignments, but return with an excuse that "they were canceled or the requisition never came in." He told me I was one of his top candidates for placement. In his last offer, he told me the temp assignment location was out-of-my area, and I denied the offer. I only use public transportation because I can't drive. I later found out he contacted the Texas Workforce Commission (TWC) and said I refused my office. The Texas Workforce Commission can refuse your unemployment if you refuse "suitable work." But after investigation, TWC awarded my unemployment. Is this ethical for a temporary recruiter to report to unemployment? I believe it was a tactic to stop my unemployment. Here is how our CAREEREALISM-Approved Experts answered this question on Twitter: Q#400 They turned you in because it raises their cost! But still not good move from them. Talk to the recruiter or move on. (@thejobgenius) Q#400 Possible recruiter didn't know repercussions of telling TWC you refused, and why? Talk to recruiter. (@teenarose) Q#400 Only unethical if they are doing it maliciously. They likely have an obligation to report the "technical truth." (@gradversity) Q#400 Ethical? NO. Difficult to lose the connection, but RUN from him. No telling happens next time he doesn't get his way. (@DawnBugni) Our Twitter Advice Project (T.A.P.) is no longer an active campaign. To find an answer to the above question, please use the "Search" box in the right-hand column of this website.

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It's beginning to look a like Christmas! Well, not quite yet. But if you're looking to make some extra cash during the holiday season, now is the time to begin searching as seasonal jobs are starting to be posted.

According to the website Snagajob, 27% of companies that hire employees for the holiday season begin their recruitment efforts in August. In addition, Snagajob reports that there is money to be made during the holiday season as seasonal workers earned an average of $15.40 an hour in 2018. With that in mind, here are some options to consider if you're looking for a seasonal job for the holiday season.

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