Dear Experts, I just graduated and have been looking all summer for a job. An internship opportunity came up that is incredibly cool - HOWEVER, it doesn't pay a dime. I accepted it and agreed to start in September. Since then, I got an interview and landed a job with a company this week. The job isn't very exciting and the pay is really low. So, I'm wondering, should I stick with the cool internship or take the paying job? Here is how our T.A.P. experts answered this question:Q#268 Sounds like the internship is in your field. Chance of FT later? Don't take job just b/c it's a job. (@heatherhuhman) Q#268 The internship is worth more in the long run. But if you need to get paid, there's no shame in the other job (@gradversity) Q#268 Intern v. paying job: If $ isnt the issue thn whichevr positions U better 4 mtng UR nxt career objective. (@RTResumepro) Q#268 It all depends on if you can survive without an income. Or U could take a PT job while interning. (@beneubanks) Q#268 U know answer in ur gut; do u need $? If not, give urself permission 2 follow heart. (@juliaerickson) Our Twitter Advice Project (T.A.P.) is no longer an active campaign. To find an answer to the above question, please use the "Search" box in the right-hand column of this website.

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