Bringing Back Work Ethic: How To Make More Money

One of the biggest challenges facing American prosperity is the loss of the good old-fashioned work ethic. We all want more out of life. More success, more money, more stuff. But at the same time, we also want more time off for “leisure activities.” In fact, there has been a renewed call lately for the four-day workweek, with the argument that “working less is the key to success.” This question of whether it’s possible to work “smarter not harder” has sparked an array of reactions. But if you were to ask the opinion of professional athletes, pastors, corporate CEOs, former presidents, entrepreneurs, four-star generals, Academy Award-winning actors, and the country’s most successful people, you know they would all advocate hard work and long hours. On the other side of the coin are those that suggest there are shortcuts to success. The question is, should America adopt this type of philosophy? We’ve been working less and less over the last 100 years already. According to the US Department of the Interior, in 1901, Americans worked an average of 58.5 hours a week; in 1929 that average was down to 50 hours; and in 2013 we are down to a mere 39.2 hours a week. This idea of working less, yet continuing to want more, is becoming a dangerous societal trend. No other country has close to the innovation and creativity that America has contributed to the world. Could it have something to do with the fact we have less vacation time on average than most other countries? This article from CNN.com shows that among 40 countries surveyed, only China has less vacation days (21) than the U.S. (25), with countries like Greece (37), France (40) and Brazil (41) leading the pack. Could there be a relationship between this and being an economic superpower? There are a few challenges with society today, but a big one is that people don’t understand what it means to work hard, really hard, to earn success. The successful achiever has consistent work cycles where he is putting in 55-70 hour workweeks over several months before taking a break. It’s these individuals who want to make more out of life for themselves, their families and society. Ask the entrepreneur leading his growing workforce, or the father working two jobs to send his children to college – there is a direct connection between putting in the time and finding success. Here is the basic roadmap to bring back the American work ethic that has built our nation:


If You Want More Money, Turn Off The Distractions

We get so wrapped up in the dreams of the American Idol contestants or the lives of the Kardashians that we let them replace our own story and our own goals. Put down the video games, turn off the TV, stop checking Facebook, and start focusing on ways to build your dream and ultimately make more money.

Make Your “Leisure Time” Work For You

Hours spent in a year on leisure time in 1880 was 43,800 hours. In 1995 it had more than tripled to 176,000 hours and by the year 2040 it is projected to be 246,000 hours. We’re on track to have more and more time “for ourselves” – so how are you going to spend it?

Take Responsibility

We hear it all the time: It’s my job, it’s my family, it’s this or that. Are you going to keep making excuses with a “victimhood mentality” or take the bull by the horns and take responsibility? Dreams without hard work are nothing more than fantasies.

Be Curious About Your Potential

People need to start being curious again. Curious about what we are capable of; curious enough to ask ourselves the question “what if?” Curiosity is what leads us to understanding our personal identity and self-image. The more we work challenge our mindsets, the closer we get to clearing up all the clutter in our minds. Photo Credit: Shutterstock

If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the awkward situation one of our viewers, Diane submitted. She has recently worked with a co-worker on a group project. When it came time to present the project at a meeting, Diane let her co-worker present. While it went great, the co-worker proceed to take credit for nearly all of Diane's work. Frustrating to say the least!

SHOW MORE Show less

In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if your co-worker took credit for the work you did...right in front of your colleagues AND boss!

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

SHOW MORE Show less

If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the awkward situation one of our viewers, Cam submitted. He's been working at a job for awhile, but recently overheard a hiring manager making fun of a candidate with autism right after an interview-not only awkward, but VERY unprofessional!

SHOW MORE Show less

In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if witnessed a hiring manager at your organization making fun of a candidate who they had just interviewed who had autism.

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

SHOW MORE Show less

Starting a family is one of the biggest milestones in a person's life. It's in those first few months when a parent can really bond with their newborn and make lifelong memories. However, for some new dads, it can be difficult to juggle being a new parent while remaining dedicated to their career.

Fortunately, some companies have generous paternity leave policies that give new dads the ability to take time off of work to stay home with their child.

SHOW MORE Show less

There are LOTS of questions around resume dos and don'ts. There's so much advice out there that it can be overwhelming to try and figure out what's the correct answer.

During our weekly live Office Hours on YouTube, two of our coaches, Ariella Coombs and J.T. O'Donnell, answer questions live from viewers related to their job search, career success, on the job situations and more.

We complied a simple list of what we find to be the most common questions our coaches get about resumes. We hope you find this helpful.

Let's start with the basics...

SHOW MORE Show less

Back in March, we made the hard decision to change our private Facebook group of over 37 THOUSAND members to a fee-based only platform.

SHOW MORE Show less

In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if a recruiter called you a day EARLY for your phone interview (and you were NOT PREPARED!)

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

SHOW MORE Show less