The Attitude of Success: It’s All in Your Head

Projecting an attitude of success can start with simply working on your body language. With a strong posture and a solid handshake you are well on your way to exuding confidence. But to complete the picture, to truly project an attitude of success, the real work may need to be done in your head. Some say simply believing you are successful will make you successful. Sounds crazy, right? But that’s the premise of the law of attraction. Same with the recent phenomena, The Secret. For the more scientific minded, we can reference the placebo affect. Patients told they are being given a curing medicine actually get better despite the fact what they are given is only a sugar pill. Bottom line, the brain is the most powerful organ in the body. And how we harness that power has a bearing on the image we project, and ultimately on our success. Skip the Yips Ralph Waldo Emerson said, “A man becomes what he thinks about.” To project success you need to first quiet the negative voice inside your own head. These self-limiting beliefs can be our biggest enemy when it comes to being successful. Former professional golfer Tommy Armour coined the term “yips” to describe when athletes are so caught up in their own heads they, inexplicably, can no longer perform routine parts of their game. A relatively simple putt, for instance, or an All-Star pitcher who suddenly cannot get the ball over home plate. Although science is still studying possible neurological causes for to the “yips,” it is widely believed the main cause is psychological. To project an attitude of success, stay clear of the negative and focus on the positive. Be Half Full Studies have shown a casual link between optimistic attitudes and good health. Being optimistic can do more than extend our lives however; it can also improve our success rate in business. Sales guru Zig Ziglar says attitude is a defining factor in a person’s ability to succeed. He quotes a Harvard University study found when it comes to job offers and promotions, decisions are based only 15 percent on the candidates actual technical knowledge or skill. Eighty-five percent of the decision to hire or promote an employee is based on the individual’s attitude. View your glass as half full and you’ve won more than half the battle. Be a Copycat Imitation is the highest form of flattery. Decide what success looks like to you, and learn to imitate it. Everyone’s version will be different. If, to you, success means moving up the corporate ladder, then know what it looks like on the top rung. If success means simply getting through each crazy day in an organized and stress-free fashion, then envision that day. Keep the image of success in your head and do everything possible to look like it, behave like it, and most importantly believe that you can accomplish it. When it comes to projecting an attitude for success, children’s character Bob the Builder may be the best role model. “Can we do it?” he asks his audience each day. Without questioning the details, doubting their abilities or hesitating for one moment, his audience’s answer is always the same. “Yes we can!” You go, Bob. [Reprinted from OfficeArrow] [This article was originally posted on an earlier date] Kathy Ver Eecke, founder of Working for Wonka, is a former marketing executive who now works as a writer and speaker on the topic of surviving the start-up environment and working for an entrepreneur. Read more » articles by this approved career expert | Click here » if you’re a career expert Photo credit: Helga Esteb / Shutterstock.com

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We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

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In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if witnessed a hiring manager at your organization making fun of a candidate who they had just interviewed who had autism.

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

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During our weekly live Office Hours on YouTube, two of our coaches, Ariella Coombs and J.T. O'Donnell, answer questions live from viewers related to their job search, career success, on the job situations and more.

We complied a simple list of what we find to be the most common questions our coaches get about resumes. We hope you find this helpful.

Let's start with the basics...

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