4 Rs To Help You Deal With A Bad Work Experience

Nothing is permanent in this world, especially in your career. Change happens constantly, and it's up to us on how to deal and adapt with these changes in our environment. Unfortunately, there are instances that we don't respond positively to these changes. This is especially true when our pride and attitude gets the best of us, and we lose our jobs because of unfortunate circumstances. Related: How To Answer, ‘Have You Ever Been Fired?’ It's not pretty when a bad work experience blots an otherwise spotless resume. These bad work experiences can haunt us when we're out there looking for a new job, and this can bring down our self-confidence. Whether you lose your job, resigned because of a nasty boss, backstabbing co-workers, or get chucked out because of uncontrollable events, there are ways to deal with the life in-between. It's summarized in four R's: rant, relax, recover, and restart.


1. Rant

Everyone who's ever lost a job may find themselves angry, sad, and anxious over what happened. If you lose your job because you did something wrong, were wrongly judged upon, or all of these, feel free to rant. Allow yourself to get really angry at your boss, co-worker, or any reason that made you lose your job. That said, it's important to find healthy ways to get your pent-up emotions off your chest: write about it, talk to someone about it, cry, shout, or eat a pint of ice cream. Do anything that will help you feel more in control of your emotions and less angry about the said situation. There's no right or wrong way to feel about your situation. The only thing that will be wrong is if you allow this experience to dampen your enthusiasm for work. If you go around looking for a job and still feel angry about your past work experience, it can sabotage your efforts. You don't want to be talking about your past work experience to a potential employer and badmouthing your previous boss, do you?

2. Relax

After dealing with your negative feelings about losing your job, relax and take a step back. Try to see the situation in a positive light. What are the lessons you can learn from this experience? Maybe you need to improve how you deal with higher-ups, upgrade your work skills, or interact better with people. If your idea of relaxing is to take a break for a short while before finding work again, then feel free to do so. Go on some soul-searching road trip, begin a new hobby, or just enjoy doing nothing. You'll know by yourself if you're ready to join the workforce once again.

3. Recover

Take care of yourself on your way to recovery. Don't rush yourself to feel better instantly. We all have periods when we feel down, but there comes a time that we will feel ready to take on the world again. Your feelings may shift among numbness, anger, sadness, and desolation. The important thing with emotional recovery from a bad job is that you help yourself. Don't beat yourself up. Take the things that you can change from the things you have no control over.

4. Restart

If you feel relieved after going through all the previous R's, give it a go and open yourself to all life has to offer. Not just with a new job, but with everything else. Who knows, your new job might be just the thing you're looking for in your career. Take your bad work experience as a learning experience, and use it as an advantage. People are different from each other and deal with things in different ways. Handling your past bad work experience through positive means can help you recover and get back on track with a wiser perspective. May you get the best the next time you go job hunting, minus the negative pent-up feelings.

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