How To Break The Tie: When You’re One Of Two Great Candidates

How To Break The Tie: When You’re One Of Two Great Candidates

In today’s market, there are often very highly talented people vying for the same positions. If it comes down to two (or even three) candidates, the intangibles are likely to make or break the deal. Related:5 Easy Ways To Make Yourself A More Attractive Job Candidate So, in thinking over your interviews and other interactions in your pursuit of the opportunity, ask yourself if you did the following:


  • You were always authentically you, honest about who you are, and didn’t fib on anything.
  • As part of your authenticity, you were not all about you; you care about your co-workers, the success of the organization, and you can sell your background without arrogance nor conceit.
  • Likewise, as part of your authenticity, you demonstrated through example and appropriate story telling that you are a person of high moral character and integrity.
  • You demonstrated your ability to be flexible and adaptable to changing situations.
  • You demonstrated your ability to be a team player, no matter your role on the team; and, if you were the leader of the team, you led and inspired rather than managed, where appropriate.
  • In every work (or other appropriate personal) experience, you have learned from your mistakes, and have seen failures as an opportunity rather than as a negative.
  • You can take initiative and where necessary, be creative.
  • If the organizational culture supports it, you have a good sense of humor and can keep things light when the going gets rough.
  • You have outside interests (no need to disclose anything about race, religion, politics, etc.) and keep yourself growing, both personally and professionally.
If you have done all of the above, you probably have a high factor of likeability and, thus, you are probably in a good position to get the job. If not, these are things to consider next time; don’t force them, just let them happen, as appropriate for the situation.

Related Posts

How Do Employers Find Their Ideal Candidate?3 Things HR Looks For In An EmployeeThe Best Interview Follow Up Checklist   Photo Credit: Shutterstock
Get Some Leverage
Sign up for The Work It Daily Newsletter
Follow
Man thinks about becoming self-employed
Bigstock

Look, I'm just going to say it. Not everybody should work for themselves. Right now, there's this huge craze about working independently, being self-employed, being your own boss. So much of this came out of the pandemic because people realized they wanted to have control over their careers and not be at the mercy of their employers' needs. But if you're looking to take control of your career, becoming self-employed is not always the best solution.

Still, there are many benefits to being self-employed. Let's take a look at those benefits before I dive into how you can take control of your career without having to quit your job and take on self-employment.

Read moreShow less
Executive sits down with her employees during a team meeting
Image from Bigstock

Every hiring manager looks for different skills in the job candidates they're hoping to hire. Not only are job candidates being evaluated on the hard skills they possess; they're also being evaluated on their soft skills—the skills that don't belong on a resume but can be identified during a job interview. It's these soft skills that separate the good employees from the great ones. Executives, managers, and other leaders within an organization keep this in mind when interviewing job candidates and reviewing the performance of current employees.

Read moreShow less
Featured