The Best Interview Follow Up Checklist

Knowing how to follow up after one or more interviews can be confusing, even for the most savvy job seeker. Related: The Secret To A Great Follow Up After An Interview Here is a checklist of things you can do to leverage your post-interview activities and gain interest from potential employers.


1. Find Out The Next Step

You must always ask what the next step is. One of the most discouraging situations is to believe an interview went well – only to hear nothing back from the company. One way to hedge against this is to get a verbal commitment as to the next steps. If the company says they will contact you no later than next Wednesday – you know you can safely follow up on Thursday if you have not heard back from them.

2. Don’t Think The Worst

If you have not heard back from the company you interviewed with, please don’t assume they are not interested in you and never ever act annoyed or defensive. Leave short, friendly, professional messages confirming your continued interest.

3. Use Your Common Sense

Don’t pester – but be persistent. Try to use your intuition based on the people and the corporate culture you are dealing with to know how aggressively to follow up after a job interview. Some companies love aggressive post-interview follow up, as it is part of their culture. Other companies might find it off-putting.

4. Leave A Great Follow Up Voicemail

You can say something like: “Hi Mr. Brown, this is Mary Elizabeth Bradford. It’s Wednesday morning and I am following up on our initial meeting, and I'm very excited to connect back with you. I will be in the office all day today; my number is 212-555-1212. Thanks and I really look forward to speaking with you again.” Don’t tell them you will call again if you don’t hear back from them. They may wait for you to do just that!

5. Send A Thank You Letter

I find that hard mail is much preferred over email for thank you letters. The best way I have found to write powerful thank you/after-interview letters is to mirror, match, and repeat back a summary of key points you discussed in the interview. To do this right, you will want to be taking short notes during your interview. The primary things you want to pick up include their main challenges, the kind of person they are looking for and anything positive they shared about you and your potential candidacy. Keep your letter short – under 200 words. Yes, you read that right!

6. Include A 'P.S.' In Your Follow Up Letter

Do you know what always gets read in a letter? The P.S. or postscript. If you have occasion to write one, it’s a good idea. Just be sure what your P.S. says is meaningful enough. No soft statements like, “P.S.: Did I mention I am a team player?”

7. Send A Follow Up List Of Short Testimonials

References, endorsements, and testimonials almost always have a greater impact than any other piece of information we can give a potential employer. That’s because they come from a third party perspective, which legitimizes you and authenticates what you are probably communicating with them yourself. It builds trust very rapidly—more rapidly than any other way I know. Suffice it to say—having a page of testimonials you can use as a “leave behind” or attach with a post-interview thank you letter is one of THE WISEST moves you can make in your job search. It will “seal the deal,” so to speak. These tips have helped thousands of job seekers reach their career goals easier and quicker and I know they will help you too. I wish you every success in your job search.

Related Posts

How To Answer 7 Of The Most Common Interview Questions Top 3 Tips For Phone Interviews How To Ace The Panel Interview Photo Credit: Shutterstock

All work and no play can create a tense and unwelcoming environment. Studies have shown that employers that offer additional perks have employees that are happier and more loyal to their place of employment. If you are looking for an employer that acknowledges how important it is to give its employees a place to de-stress and bond with their co-workers, check out these companies!

SHOW MORE Show less

If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the awkward situation one of our viewers, Diane submitted. She has recently worked with a co-worker on a group project. When it came time to present the project at a meeting, Diane let her co-worker present. While it went great, the co-worker proceed to take credit for nearly all of Diane's work. Frustrating to say the least!

SHOW MORE Show less

In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if your co-worker took credit for the work you did...right in front of your colleagues AND boss!

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

SHOW MORE Show less

If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the awkward situation one of our viewers, Cam submitted. He's been working at a job for awhile, but recently overheard a hiring manager making fun of a candidate with autism right after an interview-not only awkward, but VERY unprofessional!

SHOW MORE Show less

In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if witnessed a hiring manager at your organization making fun of a candidate who they had just interviewed who had autism.

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

SHOW MORE Show less

Starting a family is one of the biggest milestones in a person's life. It's in those first few months when a parent can really bond with their newborn and make lifelong memories. However, for some new dads, it can be difficult to juggle being a new parent while remaining dedicated to their career.

Fortunately, some companies have generous paternity leave policies that give new dads the ability to take time off of work to stay home with their child.

SHOW MORE Show less