How To Deal With Interviews When You're Employed

Looking for a new job while you're still at your current one? Not sure how to do both and afraid of doing the wrong thing and risking your current role? Here are some points to consider to make the process a little bit easier and hopefully much less painful. Related: How To Job Search While You’re Employed


Honesty Is The Best Policy (Where Hiring Managers And Recruiters Are Concerned)

It is best to be honest about your schedule and your times of availability from the get-go. If it will be impossible to schedule calls or in-person interviews during certain days of the week or particular times of the day, be sure to share this with a prospective hiring manager or a recruiter. Your honesty and straight forwardness will be respected.

Flex Wherever Possible

If your job does not require a set hourly schedule, experiment with flexing. Try coming in an hour or two earlier and leaving an hour or two earlier, or conversely coming in an hour later and staying later. Another option is to try and schedule interviews during and around the lunch time hour from 12-1 PM, while remaining open to the notion of leaving at 11 AM or as late as 1 PM for phone screens or in person interviews.

Avoid Excuses

If arranging flex time without raising suspicion is simply not possible, then try a tactic that avoids excuses. The most direct and professional way, and the one that eliminates the need to come up with an excuse for missing work, is to inquire if an interview may be conducted before or after work hours. While the answer may be no – at the very least you have showed yourself to be a conscientious employee.

Take Personal Business Time

If your request for a before- or after-hours interview gets denied, consider taking a full or half personal or vacation day. While too many of these may eat into actual future vacation plans, no excuse is needed and your paycheck won’t take a hit. Just remember more than one day’s notice will be appreciated by those in your current workplace.

Less Is Best

The most nerve-wracking part for most employed job seekers is communicating a workday absence. In these cases, aim for vague – as the fewer details you provide the less cover up required. If asked, explain that you have an appointment and if your job allows try and work from home. If pressed – only you can decide if it will help or harm to be up front about your job search.

Have A Plan For Wardrobe Transformations

Work in a casual office but need to wear a suit to your interview? Scope out a place to make the wardrobe change that is away from people who work in your company. Consider also elevating your work wardrobe at the office several weeks in advance. Although people may be suspicious at first, eventually they will accept your new dress choice as the new norm. Interviewing for a new job when you have a job is challenging, but not insurmountable, with a bit of planning and creativity. Happy job hunting! Disclosure: This post is sponsored by a CAREEREALISM-approved expert. You can learn more about expert posts here. Photo Credit: Bigstock

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