Why Learning A New Language Can Help Your Job Search

Parlez-vous français? Habla espanol? On Twitter, @aboutworldlangs featured an article last year: “Americans can earn 20% more an hour by learning a second language.” In the face of the culturally diverse world, language trends are too important to ignore. Eight U.S. states are either de facto (Latin reference!) bilingual or trilingual. The 2000 U.S. census ranked Spanish as the second most spoken language, followed by Chinese.


Learning A New Language Can Help Your Job Search

My native country of Canada is officially bilingual by virtue of its francophone population; in fact, one Canadian province, New Brunswick, is 40% bilingual. During my trips to the U.S., I have noticed that Spanish is becoming more prominent. Given these demographics in North America, learning a second language will propel your career or job search exponentially. Sure, it’s true that learning a second language is no easy feat, but it's achievable. French is my second language and Spanish is becoming my third. My goal is to be trilingual one day! As a certified language educator, the most valuable way to learn a language is to immerse oneself in the country or milieu in which the language is spoken. Admittedly, this isn’t the easiest route for many, so I would recommend you gain access to the various language resources on and offline, such as Rosetta Stone (ideal for visual learners), Berlitz CD’s (Céline Dion became fluent in English by the Berlitz immersion method), and Twitter handles and Facebook pages. Over the years, I have advised second language students to listen to their second language for a minimum of 15 minutes a day-whether it’s listening to a CD in your car, kitchen, or on your iPod. Take language courses in your community, watch the news with subtitles in a second language, and convert your bills into your target language. Repetition is key because we learn language in “chunks” (one word, two words, and so on, before making a sentence). On Twitter recently, @aboutworldlangs reported that learning a foreign language was an asset or requirement in seven career fields: communications, business, government, travel and tourism, education, and social services. Whether you land an upcoming job interview or hear of a possible promotion (for example, government jobs often pay a premium for being bilingual), practice your second language, in case you have to demonstrate verbal and/or written competency. It’s well known that this is the most competitive job market ever, so capitalize on learning or knowing a second language. It could be part of your professional brand. I use the bilingual brand constantly. So, how can one decide which foreign language is the most valuable to learn? Check out Valuewalk.com's article, "Which Foreign Languages Are The Most Important To Learn?" Good luck! Bonne chance! Image Credit: Shutterstock

When most people think of Nike, they think of shoes, retail stores, and, of course, athletes. That's all true, but there's more. Behind Nike's walls, you'll find the doers and thinkers who design, create, and innovate every day. There are also data scientists who discover and leverage athlete insights to create the future of sport.

You might be surprised to learn about the impact you can have in Data & Analytics at Nike versus at a major tech giant. Nike employees get to work on a wide array of challenges, so if you're obsessed with math, science, computers, and/or data, and you love sport, these stories may inspire you to work at Nike.

SHOW MORE Show less

Employee loyalty is something every company longs for. It's estimated employee turnover costs as much as 130-200% of an employee's salary. When a talented, knowledgeable, trained employee leaves, it's bad for business. And, when lots of them leave, it can be the kiss of death.

SHOW MORE Show less

If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the interview situation one of our viewers, Remi submitted. He was in an interview and was asked the question: How many cows are there in Canada right now? - What a weird question but this is a technique that some hiring managers are using these days.

SHOW MORE Show less

If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the awkward situation one of our viewers, Kevin submitted. He is a college student who's working a part time job to make ends meet. The manager/owner of the company has become a micro-manager who watches him work on camera and reads his company emails. A bit over the top wouldn't you say?

SHOW MORE Show less

All work and no play can create a tense and unwelcoming environment. Studies have shown that employers that offer additional perks have employees that are happier and more loyal to their place of employment. If you are looking for an employer that acknowledges how important it is to give its employees a place to de-stress and bond with their co-workers, check out these companies!

SHOW MORE Show less

In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if you worked for an owner who micro-manages you my watching you work on camera and reading through your company emails.

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

SHOW MORE Show less