Job Interviews

How To Market Yourself (Or Your Product) To Anyone

How To Market Yourself (Or Your Product) To Anyone

There’s a sneaky little secret that will help you market yourself to anyone. And I bet you haven’t heard of it before... Have you ever worked on a team with someone who wasn’t very motivated? Most of us have worked with someone like this. Don’t you just wish you could take that person and MAKE them do the work they need to do? Don’t you just wish they could feel the same motivation you feel to get the project done? If you’re leading a sales team, can you make them believe in the product you’re selling? If you have a teenager, can you make them happy about the family road trip you’re about to take? Well, unfortunately, you can’t. “You can’t put emotions into people,” said Lidia Arshavsky, a presentation coach at Own The Room, a communication skills training company. However, there’s good news - you CAN draw emotions out of people. And the best way to do this is by feeling the emotion first. For example, if you believe the product you’re selling is the best product on the market, your sales team is going to believe it to - that emotion is going to spread, it’s going to be infectious. Unfortunately, there’s a dark side to this truth, according to Arshavsky. “What happens when you go to a job interview and you don’t feel completely confident that this is the right match for you, that you can do this job?” she said. “How is that interviewer going to feel? They’re not going to feel confident either.” In this situation, what can you do? You need to tap into the things you DO feel confident about - your ability to learn, your eagerness to join the company, your enthusiasm for the work. You need to access those things and let them radiate. “Emotions are contagious,” said Arshavsky, “let that emotion fill the room.” The next time you want someone to feel an emotion, take a step back and let yourself feel that emotion first. If you want to market yourself to an employer or market your product to your customer, you must tap into these emotions.


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