Why Procrastination Can Be Good In A Job Search

What I'm about to write may not make sense... maybe not. You be the judge. Procrastination is discouraged in our lives, is it not? A while back, I listened to a radio interview featuring Frank Parlow, author of Wait: The Art of Science and Delay. I believe Frank's book is currently on the New York Times' book list. In contrast to the negative portrayal of procrastination, Frank calls it "management delay." He warns us that when we make snap decisions and respond immediately, the outcome isn't always favourable. According to Frank, the danger lies in reacting too quickly. Let's apply this to your job search. Supposing that things appear (operative word?) to look pretty bleak and you choose to apply for every job under the sun. Is this pressure from being on unemployment benefits? Pressure from others? Low confidence on your part? What if you "delayed" things for a little while? Frank's advice for those who choose to procrastinate is to figure out a time frame. Wait as long as you can and THEN make a decision. The wait could be milliseconds or moments. "Active procrastination" is the activity of deciding what to put off and what to prioritize correctly. So, do you really need to spend so much time online rather than making human contacts in your job search? If you've hit wall in your job search, do this:


  • Take a long pause
  • Be conscious of your circumstances
  • Contemplate what to do
  • Look into the distance and take a walk
  • Clear the air
  • Stare at nothing
  • Confront your problems and make better decisions
Let me know if "healthy" procrastination makes a difference! Photo Credit: Shutterstock
Get Some Leverage
Sign up for The Work It Daily Newsletter
Follow
Teacher lectures students in a classroom

My grandparents owned a two-story walkup in Brooklyn, New York. When I was a child, my cousins and I would take turns asking each other questions, Trivial Pursuit style. If we got the question correct, we moved up one step on the staircase. If we got the question wrong, we moved down one step. The winner was the person who reached the top landing first. While we each enjoyed serving as the “master of ceremonies on 69th Street,” peppering each other with rapid-fire questions, I enjoyed the role of maestro the most of all my cousins. I suppose I was destined to be an educator.

Read more Show less
Featured