Why You Must Make Your Resume As Good As Possible

If you want to make your resume the absolute best it can be, you will have to include one critical piece of information on your resume: Your value to the company. That’s the number one quality employers look for in a resume. What value will you bring to the company if you’re hired? Your experience may be ideal, your education may be tops, and your work history may be spotless, but it’s your value that determines whether or not you’ll land a job. Look at the simple logic behind this element of a resume. A company is looking for an individual who can help make a profit. This is why it’s critical to show a potential employer the value you can add to a company. For example, if you developed a management technique that made your previous company more proficient in filling customer orders, include that in your resume. What you did to add value to your previous employer can be simple. You mastered a technique in Dreamweaver that allows you to create CSS layouts quickly and without source code errors. This skill allowed your previous employer to get a web page up in half the time of the industry standard. That’s great. Highlight that skill in your resume. The company will understand your skill adds value. Emphasize you have a provable skill that can make the company money. Companies hire people who can increase their profit. Employees reward these people well. Write this value element in your cover letter. Don’t bury it in the middle of the resume employment section. Present it front and center to the hiring manager who’s reading the resume. Make sure the value element is the first thing he sees. Here’s why: You have 20 to 30 seconds to impress the hiring manager who’s reading the resumes. That’s all the time you get to impress an employer that you’re the best fit for the job. Surveys of hiring managers show these people are under pressure to hire the right person fast. Your first impression will determine whether your resume is thrown on the reject pile or set aside for a second look. Don’t fill your cover letter with boring clichés, such as “hard working” or “team player.” These clichés mean nothing. Tell that company what your value is immediately. This simple technique of highlighting your value will make your resume as good as possible and increase your chances of landing that job. Photo Credit: Shutterstock

All work and no play can create a tense and unwelcoming environment. Studies have shown that employers that offer additional perks have employees that are happier and more loyal to their place of employment. If you are looking for an employer that acknowledges how important it is to give its employees a place to de-stress and bond with their co-workers, check out these companies!

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In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if you worked for an owner who micro-manages you my watching you work on camera and reading through your company emails.

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

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We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

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In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if witnessed a hiring manager at your organization making fun of a candidate who they had just interviewed who had autism.

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

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