6 Ways To Secure A New Job

The traditional approach to finding a new job has been to look out for advertisements for roles you fancy. However, there are other ways you can go about securing that ideal new role. Related: 10 Ways To Network Your Way To A New Job Here are a few ways you can secure a new job:

1. Recruitment Agencies

Contact a number of recruitment agencies, ensure they have your resume and other details, explain to them what you are looking for in terms of your next role, and keep in regular contact with them so they know you are still looking. Ideally, the agencies you register with would be a combination of those that specialize in your business sector and larger agencies who might handle a greater number of vacancies. Agencies that specialize in your business sector can advise you on ways you can make yourself more employable. Some of the best agencies include PrideStaff and UltimateStaffing.

2. Job Websites

A large number of internet job sites and job boards now exist such as Monster, The Muse, and FlexJobs to name just a few. Typically these include lists of vacancies that you can apply for in the traditional manner. However, they also allow you to post your resume and other details so that employers and recruitment agencies can search for suitable candidates. Get to know the sites that employers and recruitment agencies in your business sector look at, and then post your resume. Pay special attention to job boards in your preferred sector. For example, if you’re into tech, then technology-focused job boards such as Dice should be your go-to site. And don’t forget Craigslist which is always jam-packed with jobs in your area.

3. Personal Websites

Why not take the approach of posting your details on the internet one step further, and make use of a personal website? You may already have such a site; if not you can set up a simple site or blog at very low cost or even free. Use the site to post brief details of your career and your skills, knowledge and experience. Think about keywords you could use on the site. For example, you might want to come near the top of a web search that involves the title of your profession and your location (i.e. ‘financial adviser New York'). Ensure the site includes your contact details. Sometimes it’s the more intuitive, off-the-cuff strategies that can really cause a stir and make you stand out. Even if you’re applying for a job with a traditional resume, ensure you include a link to your blog to display your passion for the particular sector.

4. Networking Websites

A number of websites focus on building work-based contacts, such as LinkedIn. You can send invitations to people you’d like to become a part of your network and, if they accept your invitation, you can then send messages to them at any time. In addition, you don’t need to keep up-to-date with the career moves of your contacts, as their profile will follow them around from job-to-job. A website of this nature will also allow you to post your resume and other details, and allow other users to search for your profile.

5. Previous Employers

Another approach you can adopt is to ask people you have worked for (or with) in the past whether they know of any opportunities. If you leave an employer, there's probably a good reason, but a number of people return to a previous employer later in their working lives (the company could be offering an attractive role, or a new role might not have worked out). Your previous colleagues may have moved on to other roles themselves, and they may be able to assist you in securing employment with their current company. Even if they are not in roles that allow them to make recruitment decisions, they can often provide valuable information to their employer’s human resources department about your skills and abilities – a kind of informal reference. It pays to keep tabs on where some of your former colleagues work now. Sometimes, an entire business department closes and every employee within that section is made redundant – this happened regularly in the UK financial services sector during the 2000s. In these circumstances, try and get the phone numbers of a few people who held management roles within the department, or try and maintain dialogue with them via a business networking site, or even a general social networking site.

6. Networking

There are a number of ways you could build a network of business contacts. When you are looking for a job, these may then be people you could ask. Simply being part of a network and having people know about your skills and experience could result in an out-of-the-blue job offer! Networks such as BNI are great for mixing with influential, local professionals and you can often visit your nearest group without having to commit to join. Examples of people who could form part of your network include:
  • Clients – If they use your services, it follows that they trust you and value your skills and knowledge
  • Suppliers – Again, if they are willing to supply you, that could also indicate that they have a favorable impression of you
  • Industry colleagues – Try attending industry events, such as seminars, or getting involved with the appropriate trade association, and get to know people in other companies in your business sector.
This post was originally published at an earlier date.

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