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Marketing: Make Small Mistakes

3 steps to keep your marketing strategies from failing.

The people who are capable of achieving results tend to act the first step quickly and spend enough time to validate. And they know success might not be the result of one shot. It is important to validate and assess the strategies to achieving goals.


Here are three steps to keep your marketing strategies from failing.

Just Jump In—Make Small Mistakes

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Even if there was a great marketing plan that worked two years ago does not mean it will work again. As the market changes, the approach and/or products are different. Marketing folks know this process is a trial and error, meaning that testing the strategies and validating the results is important. The other people might spend time researching and thinking how to avoid failing.

By the time they consider some possible result and haven't done anything, the marketing folks might finish 10 different trials.

Select Options

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Now they did 10 different tests with enough data to validate and learn from the "mistakes." The marketing folks have enough data and information to analyze and make decisions on what would work for the brand or the sales.

Evaluation

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After the experiment, you can validate how to optimize the ROI and scale up those that generate the best cost of customer acquisition (cost of marketing / number of customers it yields).


Of course, if there is enough left in the budget to do qualitative or quantitative research and time, that is also an option. If you don't know whether the project will work or not, then, the answer is "no" unless you try/test to have enough information to make the decision.

This article was not written by the WID staff, therefore the opinions and beliefs expressed in this article are the authors alone, and do not necessarily reflect Work It Daily

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