3 Ways To Stand Out At Work (Or To Recruiters!)

For those of you like me, work is more than a paycheck. It is part of my identity. It brings me pride and energizes me. And when I think about how we position ourselves at work, there is such a disconnect. We are people doing great work for companies that need our abilities. Related: How To Stand Out At A New Job (And Fit In Too) And yet, the whole thing always boils down to bullet points on a list (shiver!). Could be a job description, could be a resume. And, I don’t know about you guys, but I am so much more than bullet points. We all are. Once we realize you are more than bullet points, we can start elevating. We are so much more than our job descriptions and resumes. We are people who deliver and perform, and get results. So, how can we get our manager or a recruiter’s attention once we know we are so much more? Like anything, we need to get someone’s attention, keep their attention and close the deal. There are things we can do in each of these instances to advance our career. Here are three things you can do to stand out at work or to a recruiter:


1. Get their attention with NEAR

What’s NEAR? Numbers, Examples, Accomplishments, Results. Position yourself in these ways and it stands out. It is clear. Tangible. And really differentiated. People who talk in terms of numbers, examples, accomplishments, and results get the attention of their manager and recruiters alike because it isn’t about responsibilities. Everyone has responsibilities; the high achievers are high achievers because they are monomaniacally focused on numbers, examples, accomplishments, and results. The people that make decisions about your role in the company, your raises and so on, they are all focused on NEAR as well. Because of these reasons, you too should be focused on NEAR. Being NEAR may require you to think about what you do differently. Which is totally normal. We are not trained to think about our work in these terms. It’s new. It takes adjustment for many of us. However, when you start thinking about your work in terms of NEAR, you will see that you are going to stand out.

2. Keep them wanting more with great stories of progression

Once you’ve got their attention with your numbers, examples, accomplishments, and results, keep their attention with great stories that support those NEAR points. Did you do something remarkable that generated an increase in whatever? What did you accomplish this past quarter that you’re super proud of? Tell them the story of how that happened and how YOU contributed to that happening! Each one of your NEAR points should come with a great story. One that you’ve practiced a lot so when you get questions, you know the story as well as the time you met your spouse. Managers and recruiters are people after all, and people love great stories. Stories are memorable, and when you’re memorable, you stand out.

3. Close the deal by helping them want you

So, you’re NEAR and have great stories, now, it’s time to close. You can close by being curious and asking great questions of your manager or recruiter. When you ask great questions, you position yourself in a new light; someone who is critically thinking about your role and the business. These questions (examples here and here) will help your manager or recruiter realize that they need someone like YOU in the role. You are interviewing them. Doing this helps you seem discerning about your opportunities as if you are deciding where and how you can make an impact. It’s as if you are shopping for the next place to achieve some new NEAR points. When you are curious about the company, your manager, or the industry, you are in a unique position. When you add in your NEAR points and your great stories that support your NEAR points, you are positioned in a very memorable and unique way. It will be natural for a recruiter or manager to reach out to you for opportunities because you start out. What are some of the ways you stand out at work? What are some of your NEAR stories or examples? I love reading your comments, so keep them coming! This post was originally published on an earlier date.

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About the author

With passion and an innate curiosity, Tracey strives to push the envelope to create great experiences for talent. Tracey has been developing digital, mobile and social solutions for nearly 20 years in the talent acquisition space. Currently CredHive’s CEO, she is dedicated to changing the way hiring is done to create a more level playing field for talent. Visit CredHive to learn more.   Disclosure: This post is sponsored by a CAREEREALISM-approved expert. You can learn more about expert posts here. Photo Credit: Shutterstock

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