How To Transform Your Resume From Vintage To Viral

You may not describe yourself as “vintage,” but your resume and social media profiles may be giving off a vintage vibe. Do you love soft vintage jeans? You know, the kind that are reminiscent of the past, but somehow give off a vogue style. A vintage resume is a totally different thing. Vintage in the career world can handcuff you to a stale employment situation, one that is in dire need of a complete makeover. What can do you do to break free and launch into a fulfilling career?


How To Transform Your Resume In 6 Steps

Give your resume a face lift with these six easy steps:

1. Change The Look And Feel

In the past, resumes were initially viewed on paper. Fonts like Times New Roman were easier to read on paper. Today, resumes are almost always read online. Sans serif fonts are more easily read on a screen. These fonts are great choices: Calibri, Gautomi, or Verdana. Styles are more sophisticated. Integration of color in the category headers, bullets, or border add interest. In years past people might have included graphics and logos on a resume to call attention to certifications. Today, resumes are scanned by ATS (Applicant Tracking Software) and graphics can be garbled; in some cases boot a resume from consideration. Skip the logo graphics. How about the feel? Nothing cries vintage like a paper resume sent via U.S. Mail or fax! The only time that you need a paper copy of your resume is when you present a resume in a face-to-face interview.

2. Ditch The Physical Address

Keep it simple. Under your name, list your cell number and e-mail - without labeling them “cell” and “e-mail.” Next, list your LinkedIn URL, website URL (if you have a website), and blog URL (if you have a relevant blog). No need for a physical address. Haven’t you heard? The U.S. Postal Service is no longer delivering on Saturday! You don’t need to use ‘snail mail’ to get your resume to someone; similarly, you likely won’t be receiving traditional mail from a future employer. Including a physical address is becoming obsolete.

3. Customize Each Resume

In the past, employees stayed in one occupation for most of their career. At the very least, people remained in positions for multiple years. In that reality, one resume was fine. In today’s market, job seekers must be nimble. People change careers more frequently, manage multiple and diverse responsibilities within a single role, and must be adaptable to technology and market changes. One resume is not enough. Instead create a master resume and customize the resume for each job opportunity.

4. Create A Headline

Start your resume with a headline that captures your personal brand in five to seven words. Follow with a three to four line profile that showcases your value. Did you notice that I said, “target employer?” That's because you will customize your profile for each target. Cliché phrases are not only a waste of space in your profile, but they are also unimaginative. Avoid phrases such as “strong verbal and written communication skills,” “motivated,” “proven track record,” “results-oriented,” and “team player.” There is no need to call out the years as in “15 years' experience.”

5. Include The Right Skills

A core competencies section follows the profile. A simple three-row, three-column listing is a great presentation. You can look at a job posting and incorporate those desired skills in this section. This serves as a checklist for the hiring manager to be sure you have the business skills they need.

6. Show Them Why You're The Best

The days of long, historical resumes are over. Don’t make the mistake of simply shortening your long resume. It’s not about the length; it’s about the content. Show the scope of your responsibilities and accomplishments for the most recent and relevant 10 to 15 years of your career. Show measured results for each accomplishment.Create a crisp snapshot showing why you are the best. How will you know that you have included statements that sell you? Your statements should answer these questions for the reader:
  • What have you done before that demonstrates you will be successful in my company?
  • How did you increase revenue, decrease costs, improve productivity, and enhance customer loyalty?
  • Did get along well with others?
Take some time to update your vintage resume and watch it go viral. Lastly, remember that your resume extends beyond a document. Your LinkedIn profile, as well as, your presence other social media, are derived from your resume content. Release yourself from the handcuffs of your current employment situation by embracing these modern branding and communication strategies. Your fresh approach, responsiveness to change, and ability to embrace ‘what’s hot’ will prevent you from becoming ‘what’s not’! Enjoy this article? You've got time for another! Check out these related articles: Photo Credit: Shutterstock

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