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With so many potential employers in one spot, you definitely want to make a good impression, right? So, when thinking about your approach to an upcoming career fair, it may help to start by putting yourself in the shoes of the campus recruiter. In other words…


  • You are meeting a lot of students in one day. (A lot of students!)
  • You have a series of interviews stacked on top of each other in 30 minute blocks.
  • You are not looking for “good” students - you want to find rock stars!
Related: Top 8 Tips For Job Fair Success I’ve been involved in lots of interviews and most are pretty perfunctory. For example, nine times out of ten the student being interviewed is professional, eager to please, and will probably do fine in the workforce. As a recruiter, though, I don’t want “fine” – I want GREAT. I want someone that will make me spit out my coffee and hire them on the spot.

How To Ace A Career Fair

How can YOU become one of the “greats?" Here are some tips:

1. Have A Plan

Don’t even think of going into a career fair without knowing a) who’s going to be there and b) who you want to speak with. Recruiters don’t want to feel like you just stumbled on to their booth. They want to feel like your TOP choice, even if you’re still playing the field.

2. Have A Clue

Research, research, research. These days companies have put themselves out there so much on the web and through social media sites (Facebook, Twitter, etc.) there’s really no excuse for not knowing basic information such as core services areas and key players. Also, if you can find out who is doing the on-campus interviews for one of your top picks, don’t be afraid to call them in advance to introduce yourself. (Hint: No one does this!)

3. Understand How You’re Being Evaluated

To make the recruiting process more objective, most employers simply fill out a simple ratings sheet for each person they interview. These sheets are pretty standard and will usually cover things like personal appearance, professionalism, knowledge of the business, GPA, and so on.

4. Have Your Elevator Pitch Down

The elevator pitch is your answer to the question, “Tell me about yourself.” It needs to be under two minutes and should include some general background information, demonstrated leadership, and what you will bring to an organization. For example:

“I grew up in Seattle, but moved here to attend university. I’m a junior this year with a major in accounting and a minor in communications. I know accounting today is much more than numbers in a box so I felt my communications courses would prepare me for the demands of client service. I’m a member of student government serving as co-chair of the community outreach committee, and in that role I’ve organized projects for the United Way and Habitat for Humanity. I’ve researched your company and I know you offer the resources of a ‘Big 4’ with the personal touch of a smaller firm and I believe that combination will give me the best opportunity to contribute and grow my career in the long run.”

The best way to perfect your elevator pitch is to practice. You should be able to recite this in your sleep. Check out this list of 50 other standard interview questions you might find useful.

5. Be Confident

One of the fastest ways to turn off an interviewer is to appear overly nervous. If you can’t handle the interview – how are you going to handle clients? Naturally, you will be nervous. The trick is to appear as if you’re not, e.g. look people in the eye when you speak, be secure in your delivery (Note: This comes from practice – see above) and watch how often you use filler words like “um, ah,” and so on.

6. Carry Your Resume In An Executive Padfolio

This not only keeps your papers neat, but makes a spiral notebook or binder look like small potatoes. Also, bring at least five copies of your resume because you never know how many people will be in the interview and you definitely don’t want to come up short.

7. Demonstrate Leadership

You are also being judged on your leadership potential. Since you probably don’t have any real career experience yet, this will be evaluated by how you’ve spent your time on campus. Have you assumed any leadership roles within a student organization? Do you have any volunteer experience? What interests or passions do you have outside of your classes that could demonstrate leadership ability (e.g. mission trips, sports teams, an so on)? Employers know if you can lead in any of these capacities, then those skills readily translate into the office environment.

8. Etiquette

Finally, candidates who ascend to “Rock Star” status understand the basics of etiquette. This is not just about showing up on time. It’s about standing to shake the hand of your interviewer(s), addressing them as “Mr. or Ms.” and – very important – following up with a post-meeting thank you note or e-mail. These days success is heavily-reliant on interpersonal skills, meaning having superior manners is more than just a courtesy. It’s good business.

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Learn how to land a career you love


Everyone needs to feel their voice is heard and their contributions are important. Something as simple as sharing a drink the last hour of the day on a Friday with the team to recap wins and give praise can build camaraderie within the team.


All of the above are fairly simple to implement but can make a huge difference in morale and motivation. Have any of these tips worked well for young the past? Do you have other tips to motivate your creative team? If so, please share them with me!

Encourage curiosity. Spark debate. Stimulate creativity and your team will be better at handling challenges with flexibility and resourcefulness. Create a safe space for ideas, all ideas, to be heard. In ideation, we need the weird and off-the-wall ideas to spur us on to push through to the great ideas.

Sure, there are a ton of studies done on this, but here is my very unscientific personal take. When team members can make decisions about how they work on projects, they are more engaged and connected to the project outcome. When they see how potentially dropping the ball would affect the entire team, they step up. When they feel like what they are doing is impactful and valued, they are naturally motivated to learn more, and be even better team members.

Rarely does a one-size-fits-all style work when it comes to team motivation. I have found that aligning employee goals with organization goals works well. Taking time to get to know everyone on your team is invaluable. What parts of their job do they love? What do they not enjoy? What skills do they want to learn? Even going so far as to where they see themselves in five years career-wise. These questions help you right-fit projects, and help your team see you are committed to creating a career path for them within the company.

Most designers I know love a good challenge. We are problem solvers by nature. Consistently give yourself and your team small challenges, both design-related and not. It will promote openness within the team to collaborate, and it will help generate ideas faster in the long run. Whether the challenge is to find a more exciting way to present an idea to stakeholders or fitting a new tool into the budget, make it a challenge just to shake things up.

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