What to Do if Your Boss is Lying on LinkedIn

What to Do if Your Boss is Lying on LinkedIn
What would you do if your boss was lying about her job title on her LinkedIn page? Would you say something or let it slide? All of our career experts agreed that it probably isn't wise to make a stink about the situation. Here's why:

It Could Break His or Her Trust

"It’s the Internet equivalent of gossiping," says Bruce Hurwitz of HSStaffing.com. "Move on to something important and don’t give you boss a reason not to trust you."

It's Not Worth Your Time

"When you take a moment to step back and look at it, there isn't any benefit to challenging this title issue on LinkedIn," says Ben Eubanks of UpstartHR.com. "Bringing it up makes you look petty, and it won't change your manager's integrity issue."

You're Not the Office Police

"There is absolutely no value in saying anything," says Don Goodman of GottheJob.com. "She may have had the permission of her boss, but nonetheless, you are not the company policeman so I would leave this to higher powers to deal with."

It's None of Your Business

"It's not your place to call out your boss for possibly misrepresenting her position with the company," says Norine Dagliano of EKM Inspirations. "Let it slide."

It's Insignificant

"I think the more important thing to consider in this situation is: What impact does this job title have?" says Dorothy Tannahill-Moran of NextChapterNewLife.com. "Titles are not that significant for most companies and can be made up at the whim of the hiring manager."

It Could Come Back to Bite You

"This is one area I wouldn’t touch because," says Laura Smith-Proulx, Executive Director of An Expert Resume. "Not only does your boss hold direct authority for your reviews (and potentially your ability to ultimately be successful in the company), she’ll ultimately be found out – and you don’t want to be the person that reported her embellishment." Image Credit: Shutterstock
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