5 Tips For A Squeaky Clean LinkedIn Profile That Gets Noticed By Employers

It's time to focus on touching up your LinkedIn profile so it’s bright, shiny, and squeaky clean for employers. Here are some things to polish up on your profile: (Psst! Can't get hired? Watch this free tutorial.)


1. Remove empty terms.

Remove any subjective terminology such as "motivated, "dedicated," "results-driven," "self-starter," "high-level thinker," "quick learner," and so on. While you may have all of these traits, describing yourself in these terms means nothing to employers without proof. Anyone can say that they are a highly motivated self-starter, but how do you know it’s true? Remove empty terms like this from your resume and LinkedIn profile. Instead, just stick with quantifiable accomplishments that prove you’re qualified through results (you’ll learn more about these in a little bit).

2. Add new technologies to your LinkedIn Summary.

What new software or technologies have you learned lately that relate to your industry? Update your LinkedIn profile with any new, relevant technologies. What software are you proficient in? Whether it’s Wordpress or Excel, updating your profile with relevant technologies you use in your field allows you to further optimize your profile and fully take advantage of your Summary section.

3. Reorganize your Top Skills.

In your Top Skills section (where all of your endorsements can be found), you want to showcase the 10 hard skill sets you want to leverage in your next job. This makes is easy for employers and recruiters to see what you excel at on the job - and you want to make it as easy as possible for them to see your value! So, take a few minutes to reorganize your Top Skills to showcase your top 10 at the top. While in Edit mode, you can reorganize how your skills appear by dragging and dropping them.

4. Ditch those dense paragraphs.

Let’s go back to making it easy for recruiters and employers to see your value for a second. When you make them sift through big, dense paragraphs in your Work History to find the information they need, you’re making it HARDER for them, not easier! Remember, white space is your friend. Swap out those murky paragraphs for clear, concise bullet points of your quantifiable accomplishments instead.

5. Add numbers wherever possible.

Your goal is to demonstrate your value to employers. They want to know that you’ve been there, done that, and can do it well. The best way to do that is to quantify your accomplishments. Always ask, how many, how much, how long, and how often? Remember my simple formula: numbers = results = value. So, add this minor task to your Spring cleaning list this year. It won’t take long, but it will make all of the difference to employers when it comes to looking at your profile. (Want to make your life easier for next time? Keep up with your LinkedIn profile by reviewing it every month or so and making updates as needed.)

Are you ready to get HIRED?

Watch our free tutorial "8 Ways You're Being SHUT OUT Of The Hiring Process" with career expert J.T. O'Donnell to find out what's holding you back from getting hired... and how to fix it! WATCH NOW This post was originally written by Ariella Coombs.

In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if your co-worker took credit for the work you did...right in front of your colleagues AND boss!

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

SHOW MORE Show less

If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the awkward situation one of our viewers, Cam submitted. He's been working at a job for awhile, but recently overheard a hiring manager making fun of a candidate with autism right after an interview-not only awkward, but VERY unprofessional!

SHOW MORE Show less

In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if witnessed a hiring manager at your organization making fun of a candidate who they had just interviewed who had autism.

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

SHOW MORE Show less

Starting a family is one of the biggest milestones in a person's life. It's in those first few months when a parent can really bond with their newborn and make lifelong memories. However, for some new dads, it can be difficult to juggle being a new parent while remaining dedicated to their career.

Fortunately, some companies have generous paternity leave policies that give new dads the ability to take time off of work to stay home with their child.

SHOW MORE Show less

There are LOTS of questions around resume dos and don'ts. There's so much advice out there that it can be overwhelming to try and figure out what's the correct answer.

During our weekly live Office Hours on YouTube, two of our coaches, Ariella Coombs and J.T. O'Donnell, answer questions live from viewers related to their job search, career success, on the job situations and more.

We complied a simple list of what we find to be the most common questions our coaches get about resumes. We hope you find this helpful.

Let's start with the basics...

SHOW MORE Show less

Back in March, we made the hard decision to change our private Facebook group of over 37 THOUSAND members to a fee-based only platform.

SHOW MORE Show less

In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if a recruiter called you a day EARLY for your phone interview (and you were NOT PREPARED!)

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

SHOW MORE Show less

If you caught our last video in our latest series, "Well This Happened..." you heard about the problem one of our viewers is having with their co-worker. To recap, they have a colleague that overshares a little too much, and they weren't sure how to go about addressing this. We had some great responses from our viewers on how they think our friend should handle this. Check out the answer below and let us know if you guessed right or not!

SHOW MORE Show less

Negotiating salary can be a scary, intimidating experience. However, if you go in prepared, it doesn't have to be that way - you can confidently negotiate for a salary you deserve. But how?

SHOW MORE Show less