Executives: Don’t Make These 4 LinkedIn Mistakes

I work with executives on a daily basis. I am a talent agent for the corporate elite. I help them create marketing strategies for their multi-million dollar businesses-of-one. Given the average executive I consult makes a minimum of $250,000 per year, you’d think they’d all at least have fantastic LinkedIn profiles, right? Wrong! That is usually one of the first elements of my client’s executive brand I need to fix. Here are the four most common LinkedIn branding mistakes made by executives: 1. Label yourself as CEO, Board Director, or some other title that doesn’t define your expertise. Your title doesn’t tell readers what your specialty is. Executives need to list their top four to six executive-level skill sets. Recruiters search on these skill sets. They don’t search on “CEO.” Branding is about problem solving, not c-suite titles. Save the titles for the Work History section. 2. Write an epic-long novel with run-on paragraphs for a Summary. Your Summary should be short and keyword driven. Less is more. Create visual white space and only list the most important accomplishments. The average LinkedIn viewer has formed an impression about you within five seconds of reading your Summary. A long-winded paragraph of subjective text is the fast way to say, “I think I’m pretty important... and I’m trying really hard to convince you I am too.” 3. Write about yourself in the third person. Some other experts might disagree with me, but I believe you should write your profile in the first person. Your profile is about you. It’s understood it’s yours. You have access to it, so you must have written it. Writing it in the third person makes you appear too good for LinkedIn. It removes you from the networking aspect of this social tool. It makes you appear full of yourself. We laugh at pro athletes when they talk about themselves in the third person, do you want to be viewed the same way? 4. No explanation of Work History. You list what companies you worked for with dates of employment, but nothing else. Not a single quantifiable accomplishment is listed. Not only does this decrease your chances of being found by headhunters looking for your talents, it also makes your LinkedIn profile look unfinished, or thrown together quickly. That’s not a message any executive should be sending.

Your Next Step

Watch my webinar that outlines how today’s busy executive can leverage marketing 2.0 techniques to find the opportunities they want and deserve. The title of the presentation is, "6 Simple Steps to Leveraging Your C-Suite Status." WATCH WEBINAR NOW ► This powerful training reveals:
  • How social media is the “new normal” in executive branding
  • The steps necessary to create a respectable brand online
  • Examples of how to use authority marketing techniques to network your way to a new opportunity
WATCH WEBINAR NOW ► Executive image from Shutterstock

When most people think of Nike, they think of shoes, retail stores, and, of course, athletes. That's all true, but there's more. Behind Nike's walls, you'll find the doers and thinkers who design, create, and innovate every day. There are also data scientists who discover and leverage athlete insights to create the future of sport.

You might be surprised to learn about the impact you can have in Data & Analytics at Nike versus at a major tech giant. Nike employees get to work on a wide array of challenges, so if you're obsessed with math, science, computers, and/or data, and you love sport, these stories may inspire you to work at Nike.

SHOW MORE Show less

Employee loyalty is something every company longs for. It's estimated employee turnover costs as much as 130-200% of an employee's salary. When a talented, knowledgeable, trained employee leaves, it's bad for business. And, when lots of them leave, it can be the kiss of death.

SHOW MORE Show less

If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the interview situation one of our viewers, Remi submitted. He was in an interview and was asked the question: How many cows are there in Canada right now? - What a weird question but this is a technique that some hiring managers are using these days.

SHOW MORE Show less

If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the awkward situation one of our viewers, Kevin submitted. He is a college student who's working a part time job to make ends meet. The manager/owner of the company has become a micro-manager who watches him work on camera and reads his company emails. A bit over the top wouldn't you say?

SHOW MORE Show less