5 Steps To Finding Your Work Passion

A lot of people tell you to follow your passion, follow your dreams, or do what makes you happy. But how many people are really doing it? Survey after survey indicates that the majority of employees are unhappy in their professions or wished they had pursued other passions earlier. So, why do they stay? Related: How To Find Your Passion (Even If You Don’t Know Where To Start!) In reality, it may be a case of not really understanding what you want to do. Finding your work passion is tough when you have no idea where to start. However, the alternative of not figuring it out can leave you even more unhappy, bitter, and unproductive. When you realize you want to do something else but have no idea where to begin, follow these steps to get started:


1. Evaluate What Drives You

In order to find your work passion, you have to evaluate what drives you. What makes you tick? What issues do you feel particularly excited about? What cause or stance would make you drop everything to make life better? Answering these questions can help you to assess your interests and decide where you can place them in your professional life.

2. Connect These Strengths To A Career

Not every interest translates into a career. For example, just because you love soccer doesn’t mean you can make a career out of it. Instead, focus on the strengths that you have and connect these strengths to a career path. So, for the person who’s interested in soccer, perhaps you also have a real interest in how the sport is marketed. You may want to look into sports marketing positions, which can fulfill both interests.

3. Ask Yourself If It’s Realistic

You may be a great public speaker. However, that doesn’t mean you should be the president. Setting realistic expectations can help you to navigate these strengths into a suitable career. While not everyone can be the president, you can pursue public speaking opportunities elsewhere. To help you, try making a list of all of jobs you would like to have and narrow them down to jobs you have the most chances of actually landing.

4. Network And Gain Connections

Networking and gaining the right connections can have dual benefits. First, networking can help you meet people with similar dreams and work passions. These connections can then let you know how they got to where they are, share pros and cons about your passion, and provide some real insight into what you can expect. Next, networking and gaining the right connections can help you break into an industry. Think of it as that golden ticket to finding and then landing those jobs those jobs you would do anything for. This is particularly vital to those who haven’t worked in the given space, even if they love it.

5. Be Bold

Being bold can get you far in life. It’s how so many innovators and leaders reached that level of greatness. While your work passion may be out there, it’s necessary to pursue it if it’s important enough to you. Sure, it’s probably going to take a lot of hours, many forks in the road, and late nights. However, being bold means taking the good with the bad and moving forward with the notion that it’s all worth it. And if it’s not worth it, then you can move on to something that is. Finding your work passion and relevant jobs when you have no idea where to start can be very frustrating. However, once you understand what your passion is, you can get busy getting your life started -- and be happier because of it. What do you think? What are some other ways to find your work passion and relevant jobs when you have no idea where to start?

Related Posts

7 Thoughts About Finding Your Passion In Life 6 Things Passion For Work Is NOT Your Career Path: Follow The Money Or Your Dreams?   Photo Credit: Shutterstock

If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the awkward situation one of our viewers, Diane submitted. She has recently worked with a co-worker on a group project. When it came time to present the project at a meeting, Diane let her co-worker present. While it went great, the co-worker proceed to take credit for nearly all of Diane's work. Frustrating to say the least!

SHOW MORE Show less

In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if your co-worker took credit for the work you did...right in front of your colleagues AND boss!

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

SHOW MORE Show less

If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the awkward situation one of our viewers, Cam submitted. He's been working at a job for awhile, but recently overheard a hiring manager making fun of a candidate with autism right after an interview-not only awkward, but VERY unprofessional!

SHOW MORE Show less

In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if witnessed a hiring manager at your organization making fun of a candidate who they had just interviewed who had autism.

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

SHOW MORE Show less

Starting a family is one of the biggest milestones in a person's life. It's in those first few months when a parent can really bond with their newborn and make lifelong memories. However, for some new dads, it can be difficult to juggle being a new parent while remaining dedicated to their career.

Fortunately, some companies have generous paternity leave policies that give new dads the ability to take time off of work to stay home with their child.

SHOW MORE Show less

There are LOTS of questions around resume dos and don'ts. There's so much advice out there that it can be overwhelming to try and figure out what's the correct answer.

During our weekly live Office Hours on YouTube, two of our coaches, Ariella Coombs and J.T. O'Donnell, answer questions live from viewers related to their job search, career success, on the job situations and more.

We complied a simple list of what we find to be the most common questions our coaches get about resumes. We hope you find this helpful.

Let's start with the basics...

SHOW MORE Show less

Back in March, we made the hard decision to change our private Facebook group of over 37 THOUSAND members to a fee-based only platform.

SHOW MORE Show less

In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if a recruiter called you a day EARLY for your phone interview (and you were NOT PREPARED!)

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

SHOW MORE Show less