The Importance Of 'Staying In The Loop' At Work

Information is power. Knowledge is power. At work, information and knowledge allow us to be at our best and contribute in a highly effective manner. We stay focused on the important, are fully aware of emerging issues and obstacles, and understand the "big picture." Without timely information and knowledge, we end up working in a vacuum and we're not hooked in to "real time" needs, opportunities, and circumstances. Related: How To Build Positive Workplace Relationships You simply can't effectively succeed if you're out of the information loop at work. You're bound to get tripped up. Are you in the loop or out of the loop? Some signs you may be out of the loop include:


  • You hear about things only as they are happening, with no advanced notice or no forewarning.
  • You hear about company matters from people and friends outside of your company; you may hear about things first in the media.
  • Others at work often surprise you with things they know about the company.
  • You often find the project you're working on has been "tabled" or is no longer important - after having spent significant time and effort on the project.
So, what can you do to stay in the loop? How do you keep current on company events, happenings and results? Consider these ideas:
  • Build and maintain your internal network. Do this particularly with individuals outside of your group or department. Expand your "coverage" within the company. Go to lunch, have coffee, attend company outings, and so on.
  • Set up a "Google Alert" using your company name as the search string. You can have those alerts routed to your e-mail box or dropped into Google Reader if you subscribe to that application.
  • Stay in touch with alumni - people who have left the company. You'll be surprised at how "in the loop" some of those people can be.
  • Maintain a great relationship with your boss/manager/supervisor. Spend time with them often. Ask questions, be alert for signals.
  • Read all information published by your company - newsletters, annual reports, press releases, and so on.
  • Keep your eyes and ears open. Be alert when "outsiders" visit the company, particularly if they spend time interviewing the management team. Ask about those situations.
  • Share knowledge YOU gain with others. You'll set up a reciprocal type relationship when you do so.
A final note: Beware of the "Rumor Mill." Always confirm things you hear with others in the organization whom you trust. Don't be shy about asking your boss or supervisor. Dispel rumors once you know the real story - don't let them fester. This post was originally published at an earlier date.

Related Posts

How To Stand Out At Work How To Overcome Workplace Fears How To Be Assertive In The Workplace   Photo Credit: Shutterstock

When most people think of Nike, they think of shoes, retail stores, and, of course, athletes. That's all true, but there's more. Behind Nike's walls, you'll find the doers and thinkers who design, create, and innovate every day. There are also data scientists who discover and leverage athlete insights to create the future of sport.

You might be surprised to learn about the impact you can have in Data & Analytics at Nike versus at a major tech giant. Nike employees get to work on a wide array of challenges, so if you're obsessed with math, science, computers, and/or data, and you love sport, these stories may inspire you to work at Nike.

SHOW MORE Show less

Employee loyalty is something every company longs for. It's estimated employee turnover costs as much as 130-200% of an employee's salary. When a talented, knowledgeable, trained employee leaves, it's bad for business. And, when lots of them leave, it can be the kiss of death.

SHOW MORE Show less

If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the interview situation one of our viewers, Remi submitted. He was in an interview and was asked the question: How many cows are there in Canada right now? - What a weird question but this is a technique that some hiring managers are using these days.

SHOW MORE Show less

If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the awkward situation one of our viewers, Kevin submitted. He is a college student who's working a part time job to make ends meet. The manager/owner of the company has become a micro-manager who watches him work on camera and reads his company emails. A bit over the top wouldn't you say?

SHOW MORE Show less