How To Explain A Low GPA In An Interview

You finally get the interview for your dream job. You’re looking good, feeling confident, and then you get hit with what could be a fatal blow. The interviewer says, “The other candidates for this position had a much higher GPA.” Related: #1 Reason You Get Interviews But Not Offers


How To Explain A Low GPA In An Interview

But this does not have to be “the end.” There are a several ways to recover and come across as the strongest candidate you can be – even securing the role. Here are some tips:

Stay Confident

Don’t let an objection shake your confidence. If you were not considered to be a serious contender, you would not be sitting in the interview seat. Interviewers often hit you with one or more tough questions or challenge you with statements to see how you react. They want to know if you will be crushed by the pressure or if you will mount an argument to show that you deserve the position. How you handle responding to a low GPA provides insight as to how you might behave on the job.

Always Have A Plan

It is critical to sell yourself. After a major sports event, the athletes are often asked, “What was your plan?” Invariably, the athlete will detail his initial plan and then explain how he went to a plan B when circumstances changed. The same strategy holds true in an interview; winners always have a primary plan and the contingency plan when the inevitable happens: Plan A goes awry. If a low GPA is your Achilles Heel, make a plan in advance to overcome that weakness. It is foolish to ignore your weaknesses. Have a game plan for handling any objections, challenges, or tough questions thrown at you.

Sell Your Strengths

Don’t spend a lot of energy explaining your weaknesses. Instead sell your unique strengths. It does not matter that you are up against competition with near-perfect GPAs. That does not mean someone else’s entire profile is perfect. In what areas did you shine? Were you a leader on campus? Were you an athlete at a Division I school? Did you complete a high-profile internship? Convey your top strengths.

Provide Valid Reasons

Everyone hates excuses. You will need to share a valid reason or reasons for your grades. Maybe a couple of math courses really hurt your GPA. If math is not a necessary skill in your career, that may be worth sharing. If you do, be sure your GPA in your field of study is excellent. Another factor worth mentioning is how your time was divided. Were you juggling campus activities, tutoring other students, community service, or a work-study program? Were you on a sports team, dance group, or orchestra that required you to practice 16 hours per week? Suddenly, that less than stellar GPA is looking like you were juggling multiple priorities – all with a certain level of importance and commitment level. The main takeaway is this: Do not allow a single issue or question to knock you down. Evaluate yourself and prepare a case for why you are the strongest candidate. Present a portrait of your whole self and the value you offer the hiring company. Play to your strengths and make sure you are prepared to answer challenging questions with grace and aplomb. This post was originally published at an earlier date.

Related Posts

Why Your Experience And Education Won’t Get You Hired Resumes When You Don’t Have A College Degree How To Address An Incomplete Degree On Your Resume

About the author

With 20+ years as a strategic career advisor, Debra helps clients obtain highly desired interviews for competitive positions, including preparing results-oriented resumes, and providing guidance centered around interview preparation, salary negotiations, and overall career management. Visit her website at Careersdonewrite.com!   Disclosure: This post is sponsored by a CAREEREALISM-approved expert. You can learn more about expert posts here. Photo Credit: Shutterstock

If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the interview situation one of our viewers, Remi submitted. He was in an interview and was asked the question: How many cows are there in Canada right now? - What a weird question but this is a technique that some hiring managers are using these days.

SHOW MORE Show less

If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the awkward situation one of our viewers, Kevin submitted. He is a college student who's working a part time job to make ends meet. The manager/owner of the company has become a micro-manager who watches him work on camera and reads his company emails. A bit over the top wouldn't you say?

SHOW MORE Show less

All work and no play can create a tense and unwelcoming environment. Studies have shown that employers that offer additional perks have employees that are happier and more loyal to their place of employment. If you are looking for an employer that acknowledges how important it is to give its employees a place to de-stress and bond with their co-workers, check out these companies!

SHOW MORE Show less

In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if you worked for an owner who micro-manages you my watching you work on camera and reading through your company emails.

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

SHOW MORE Show less

If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the awkward situation one of our viewers, Diane submitted. She has recently worked with a co-worker on a group project. When it came time to present the project at a meeting, Diane let her co-worker present. While it went great, the co-worker proceed to take credit for nearly all of Diane's work. Frustrating to say the least!

SHOW MORE Show less

In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if your co-worker took credit for the work you did...right in front of your colleagues AND boss!

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

SHOW MORE Show less