The Power Of Persistence In Your Career

There is a framed photo on my desk of a runner out for a run in a beautiful field with mountainous views. The photo says, "Persistence - The race goes not only to the swift but to those who keep running." Related: Act Like A Business Owner To Advance Your Career I love this photo because it reminds me to be persistent in the pursuit of my goals and dreams. When we are persistent, we act with conviction, and that energy draws us toward those people and events that help our dreams come to fruition. Even if they don't show up exactly how we want or think they should or, we are met with obstacles and roadblocks along the way, it is the persistent pursuit of our goals that will eventually bring them into reality. This also holds true for our career goals. A great example of this happened with two of my colleagues who were seeking promotion opportunities inside their companies. In fact, they both had the same goal of reaching the highest-level sales position inside their (different) organizations. One colleague gave her pursuit approximately two years, and when she did not see the results she was seeking, she decided to pursue a different goal and left her company to start her own marketing consultation business. Two years later, her consulting business had not yet grown to the level she desired so she abandoned it. She went back to her original goal of seeking a high-level sales position inside another large corporation. She is 18 months into that job and I recently found out she is, again, not seeing her upward movement happen fast enough so she's beginning to consider alternate opportunities. Since setting the original goal to reach the highest-level sales position in his company, my other colleague has been in several different roles in his company (all sales related). He continues to broaden his knowledge of all sectors of his company and all their different customers in his pursuit of his ultimate goal. He has had some missteps and has taken a few steps backwards as he grown over the past few years, but he has not gotten discouraged. Some of his greatest learning has come from some of his low points. He knows the more he perseveres and the more he succeeds in his current assignments, the closer he gets to his ultimate goal. He has reached the position of Sales Director, which is several levels above where he was when he first began to consciously pursue this goal. This demonstrates his continued positive progression along his career path. Even events that seem like obstacles or that could be perceived as "slowing him down" do not discourage or derail him. He knows all the assignments and new learning are grooming him for the highest-level sales position. He also believes, despite how much he wants to reach that position in his current company, if it doesn't happen where he is presently working, it will happen somewhere else. He does not lose sight of his ultimate desire and he keeps persisting and pursuing because he knows the race will go to he (or she) who keeps on running. I love this story of his dedication and persistence. It is a reminder to us to never lose sight of where we want to go and to never stop persevering. If we are committed and persistent and open to the variety of possibilities and paths that will take us to our desired place, one day we will wake up and realize that we have reached that ultimate goal. Why? Because we kept on going. This post was originally published at an earlier date.


Related Posts

Preparing For A Career Discussion With Your Manager 3 Career Development Tips That Will Get You Ahead Of The Competition 4 C’s To Career Success   Photo Credit: Shutterstock

When most people think of Nike, they think of shoes, retail stores, and, of course, athletes. That's all true, but there's more. Behind Nike's walls, you'll find the doers and thinkers who design, create, and innovate every day. There are also data scientists who discover and leverage athlete insights to create the future of sport.

You might be surprised to learn about the impact you can have in Data & Analytics at Nike versus at a major tech giant. Nike employees get to work on a wide array of challenges, so if you're obsessed with math, science, computers, and/or data, and you love sport, these stories may inspire you to work at Nike.

SHOW MORE Show less

Employee loyalty is something every company longs for. It's estimated employee turnover costs as much as 130-200% of an employee's salary. When a talented, knowledgeable, trained employee leaves, it's bad for business. And, when lots of them leave, it can be the kiss of death.

SHOW MORE Show less

If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the interview situation one of our viewers, Remi submitted. He was in an interview and was asked the question: How many cows are there in Canada right now? - What a weird question but this is a technique that some hiring managers are using these days.

SHOW MORE Show less

If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the awkward situation one of our viewers, Kevin submitted. He is a college student who's working a part time job to make ends meet. The manager/owner of the company has become a micro-manager who watches him work on camera and reads his company emails. A bit over the top wouldn't you say?

SHOW MORE Show less

All work and no play can create a tense and unwelcoming environment. Studies have shown that employers that offer additional perks have employees that are happier and more loyal to their place of employment. If you are looking for an employer that acknowledges how important it is to give its employees a place to de-stress and bond with their co-workers, check out these companies!

SHOW MORE Show less

In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if you worked for an owner who micro-manages you my watching you work on camera and reading through your company emails.

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

SHOW MORE Show less