(function() { var cookie = 'rebelmouse_abtests='; cookie += '; Max-Age=0'; document.cookie = cookie + '; Path=/; SameSite=None; Secure'; })();

What do companies look for when they read a resume? Recently, I asked that question on an online business site. Replies came from 18 hiring and department managers working in colleges, electronics companies, banks, sales, engineering, and human resources among others. Related: 5 Mistakes Job Seekers Make On Their Resume Overwhelmingly (11 out of 18), they first checked the resume to make sure the skills and experience met their needs as outlined in the job description. No one wants to hire a brain surgeon without a medical degree or a chef who’s never worked in a kitchen. Often, the responders defined “experience” as number of years in the field. Does this mean you can submit a laundry list of skills and job titles and get hired? No. After that first glance, most of the people responding looked for accomplishments or achievements. Your resume has to explain what you did with your skills. How did the company benefit? Did you develop a new report, increase sales, interact well with your peers and managers, lead a team, volunteer in the community, meet deadlines, streamline a process, help make a project successful, complete a class, give a presentation, serve on a committee, receive praise from customers or earn a promotion? The way you used your skills to benefit your old company tells your new company what to expect. They know whether you’ll be a valuable addition to their team. This post was originally published on an earlier date.


Related Posts

How To Customize Your Resume 3 Tips For Flaunting Your Value On Your Resume How To Make Dates On A Resume Work For You Photo Credit: Shutterstock
Learn how to land a career you love

If the stress of juggling school, work, and family is making life difficult, you are not alone. According to a recent study on college employment, 43% of the nation's full-time college undergraduates and 81% of part-time undergraduates worked while getting a degree. Not surprisingly, time shortage is one of the biggest reasons for students dropping out before completing their degree. So how do you make sure that you stay the course?

SHOW MORE Show less

Whether you're new to LinkedIn or you're a seasoned user, connecting with new people can be a challenge, especially when you're not sure what to write in your LinkedIn invitation. You might be tempted to use the generic "I'd like to add you to my professional network on LinkedIn" template, but beware! By not personalizing your message, you could lose a precious opportunity to network.

SHOW MORE Show less

TikTok, the popular social media platform that allows users to make and share short-form videos, is not just for individuals looking for funny and entertaining content. It's also an amazing opportunity for employers to step up their employer branding efforts and engage with job seekers in a new and exciting way.

SHOW MORE Show less

Latest