How To Create Effective Achievements On Your Resume

In my job as a Head of Recruitment at Yieldify and in my interview coaching practice, I see a lot of resumes on a daily basis. Related: 2 Ways To Prove Your Value On A Resume (Or LinkedIn Profile) Most of them don’t stand out – many resumes are very duty-oriented, and often what job seekers call ‘achievements’ are really their daily responsibilities. If you’ve kept customers happy or finished reports on time, you were simply doing your job. When looking for a new job, it is important you have several accomplishment stories to use on your resume and during job interviews. It is also important that the achievements you share are relevant to the jobs you’re applying for (sometimes I see resumes with great achievements which have ZERO relevance to the job they’re applying for!) You want to be able to quantify your experience as much as you can. If you’ve done something that has increased sales, or saved time/money, it is likely to impress potential employer. Perhaps you’ve coordinated team events at the best yet economical locations saving expenses by 30% or you’ve increased sales by 25%. You might have introduced a user friendly electronic filing system which reduced file retrieval time by 40% or you’ve attained a title of ‘Best Employee of 2014’ by providing excellent customer service. Tell the story – paint the picture of how you’ve turned a situation around/what would have happened if you hadn’t taken action and how you’ve made it a success. I’d recommend using PAR format to demonstrate how you can contribute to the employer’s needs – here is the format:


Problem/Challenge

Here you summarize a problem or a challenge and explain the context, for example: “within tight time frames,” “during a major reorganization," and so on.

Action

Tell them what you did – even if you’ve worked as part of a team, you need to explain your contribution. The key here is to be specific and use strong action verbs.

Result

Explain the business impact of your actions. You’d want to include key deliverables, “measurables” and contributions, all described in terms of the employer’s point of view, for example:
“Deputized as team supervisor for a team of 5 staff and lead the team in successfully completing a $250,000 project in upgrading the company’s sales order entry system. This resulted in an annual company operational savings of $65,000.”
Think about what would have been different in each situation without your actions. What would not have happened if you hadn’t been there? Remember that accomplishments don’t always have to come from paid employment. College students and new grads can look to class projects, work-study, study abroad, sports, volunteer work, internships, summer jobs, and more for accomplishment stories. If you want some help in preparing for competency-based interviews, you’ll love my FREE 3-day e-course ‘How to win at job interviews’ which contains a wealth of other interview tips, too.

Related Posts

How To Quantify Your Accomplishments On A Resume 3 Ways To Emphasize Your ROI On Your Resume How To Use Military Experience On A Resume

About the author

Margaret Buj is an interview coach who has been helping professionals get hired, promoted and paid more for over eight years. She is also a qualified Personal Performance & Corporate and Executive Coach and can help you with developing confidence and the attitude that will make it easier for you to get any job you want. Schedule a complimentary consultation with Margaret here.   Disclosure: This post is sponsored by a CAREEREALISM-approved expert. You can learn more about expert posts here. Photo Credit: Shutterstock

In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if your co-worker took credit for the work you did...right in front of your colleagues AND boss!

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

SHOW MORE Show less

If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the awkward situation one of our viewers, Cam submitted. He's been working at a job for awhile, but recently overheard a hiring manager making fun of a candidate with autism right after an interview-not only awkward, but VERY unprofessional!

SHOW MORE Show less

In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if witnessed a hiring manager at your organization making fun of a candidate who they had just interviewed who had autism.

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

SHOW MORE Show less

Starting a family is one of the biggest milestones in a person's life. It's in those first few months when a parent can really bond with their newborn and make lifelong memories. However, for some new dads, it can be difficult to juggle being a new parent while remaining dedicated to their career.

Fortunately, some companies have generous paternity leave policies that give new dads the ability to take time off of work to stay home with their child.

SHOW MORE Show less

There are LOTS of questions around resume dos and don'ts. There's so much advice out there that it can be overwhelming to try and figure out what's the correct answer.

During our weekly live Office Hours on YouTube, two of our coaches, Ariella Coombs and J.T. O'Donnell, answer questions live from viewers related to their job search, career success, on the job situations and more.

We complied a simple list of what we find to be the most common questions our coaches get about resumes. We hope you find this helpful.

Let's start with the basics...

SHOW MORE Show less

Back in March, we made the hard decision to change our private Facebook group of over 37 THOUSAND members to a fee-based only platform.

SHOW MORE Show less

In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if a recruiter called you a day EARLY for your phone interview (and you were NOT PREPARED!)

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

SHOW MORE Show less

If you caught our last video in our latest series, "Well This Happened..." you heard about the problem one of our viewers is having with their co-worker. To recap, they have a colleague that overshares a little too much, and they weren't sure how to go about addressing this. We had some great responses from our viewers on how they think our friend should handle this. Check out the answer below and let us know if you guessed right or not!

SHOW MORE Show less

Negotiating salary can be a scary, intimidating experience. However, if you go in prepared, it doesn't have to be that way - you can confidently negotiate for a salary you deserve. But how?

SHOW MORE Show less