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What's Your Executive Decision-Making Style?

If you're an executive at a large organization or previously served in such a position, you likely have experience working in large groups or teams.

When working in a group to accomplish a goal, have you ever thought about your decision-making style and how it impacts others?


Getting a better understanding of your decision-making style and its impact on others is a quality of a good leader. This subject was discussed in a recent Executive Office Hours session inside Work It Daily. Executive Office Hours is available exclusively for Work It Daily's Executive-Level subscription members.

Decision-Making Styles

There are four basic decision-making styles that people fall under in a team setting:

North - A person with this style likes to take action and figure things out as they go along.

East - This person is a little more pensive with their decision making, they like to look at the bigger picture and consider all options.

South - This person likes to get a better understanding of the team dynamic and make sure that everyone's feelings are taken into consideration.

West - This person likes to pay attention to detail and is always interested in knowing the who, what, when, where and why before acting.

Why It's Important To Know Your Decision-Making Style

If you want to be a good leader, it's important to understand your decision-making style. When leading a large team of people, you'll quickly find out that everyone views teamwork differently. By understanding how everyone makes decisions, you're able to set a direction for the team in a way where everyone feels included and potentially avoid clashes among group members.

When team members don't feel comfortable with the team's approach, they feel less engaged with the company and that unhappiness often leads to staff turnover.

Understanding the four decision-making styles also allows you to take a step back and look at the bigger picture. You can evaluate the strengths and limitations of your style, while better communicating your style with colleagues. You also get a better understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of your colleagues' decision-making styles.

Your Decision-Making Style Is Part Of Your Executive Brand

If you're an executive looking for a new job, knowing your decision making-style is also a good way to see if you'll fit in with a perspective employer. If you get a sense during the interview process that the company's decision-making style process is the opposite of yours, it's something to consider before taking the job.

Ultimately, your decision-making style fits into your workplace persona, which makes up your executive brand.

If you're unfamiliar with your workplace persona, try Work It Daily's FREE Career Decoder Quiz. Understanding how your decision-making style and workplace persona work together will help you determine your professional strengths so you can market yourself more effectively to employers.


Topics like this and more are discussed every week in Executive Office Hours. In addition to a weekly presentation, each session includes personal stories and updates from other executives in the group.

Are you interested in having access to these private sessions? Check out our Executive Level subscription built for C-suite professionals who need higher-level coaching.

Members have access to high-level networking with other members of the community. Join today and gain the qualities of a good leader.

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