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3 Sneaky Ways To Research A Company

When you apply for a job, it's important to do your homework on the company. Otherwise, when you get an interview and your interviewer asks, "So, what is it about us that drew you to our company?" you aren't left stumped or jobless.

Not only that, but it's important to figure out if the company is a place YOU would enjoy working for. So, before you send off that resume, check out these sneaky ways to research a company:


Learn About The People That Work At The Company

A group of co-workers walk together at work.

Most companies have a staff page on their website. On this page, the company will list some, if not all, of the employees at the company. Here, you can get names (and sometimes contact information) of people who you'd be working with if you got the job. How to learn more:

Warning: Don't be creepy or demanding when contacting these people! Simply reach out to them in a professional manner, introduce yourself, and tell them you're interested in learning more about the company and work environment. If they respond, go you! If not, move on and leave them alone.

Find Out What The Company Is Sharing On Social Media

Businesswoman researches a company on social media.

These days, everyone is on social media—including employers. Look them up on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube, Pinterest, and so on. Look closely at what they're tweeting, posting, or filming. This is a great way to get a feel for the company's values. When browsing the social channels of companies, ask yourself these questions:

  • What events are they promoting?
  • What articles are they sharing?
  • How are they interacting with their followers?
Take note of anything that jumps out at you. If something fascinates you, mention it in your cover letter or interview.

See What The Employees Are Saying

Happy employee reviews are a good sign when researching companies.

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Ever wished there was a place that rated companies based on how much people like working there? Well, now there is! Sites like Indeed and Glassdoor are great places to learn about a potential employer and how people like working there. With these sites, individuals can comment on the company, culture, work, benefits, and more.

Not only that, but they can rate a company based on how much they like working there. You can also learn more about salary and past interviewing experiences! According to Indeed.com's Employer Branding Survey, 83% of job seekers said their decisions on where to apply are influenced by employer reviews.

So, before you apply for a job, make sure you do your research. Doing a little research can go a long way in your job search. Don't be lazy—learn more about your dream company now!


Need help finding you dream job? Work It Daily can help!

Our career coaching platform can help you in every step of the process. from the career search, interviewing, and growing your career. In addition, Work It Daily's featured employers section highlights some of the fastest-growing companies looking for new talent.

Are you an employer looking to showcase your company to perspective employees? Check out Work It Daily's Champion Badge Program and be featured as one of Work It Daily's featured employers. Work It Daily gets over 1 million site visits a month from job seekers looking for the next great career opportunity.

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