4 Simple Ways To Overcome The Age Factor In Your Resume

Growing older is something that creeps into the mind of many professionals, especially if they've reached their 50s or 60s and are on the hunt for a new job. Some worry they may not be considered viable candidates in the eyes of employers when compared to younger professionals. Related:How To Address An Incomplete Degree On Your Resume But as a wise, skilled, top-level candidate, there is no reason for you to feel any less qualified. In fact, you are likely more qualified than younger competitors; you just need to prove it. Overcome the age factor in your resume by utilizing the following four tips:


1. Focus On Recent Jobs

If you've had more than a couple of jobs during your career, then it's a good idea to focus on the more recent ones as you write your resume. A good rule of thumb is to not worry about going back more than 15 years, especially since some of what you learned prior to that may not be relevant to the job you're applying for anyway.

2. Pinpoint Your Strengths

It's even more important for you to highlight your greatest accomplishments in your career as a seasoned professional. Keep in mind the more recent the accomplishments, the better (i.e. 2009 accomplishments vs. 1979 accomplishments). Employers are not as interested in what you did at the beginning of your career—when you were still learning your craft—as they are what you have accomplished as a skilled candidate.

3. Keep Up With The Times

One reservation employers could have when considering older workers is a fear that they may not be able to keep up with technological advancements. It's good for you to show you are not only keeping up, but are right in the fold. Show you understand the Internet by submitting your resume online. Not only that, discuss your technological aptitudes in your resume, and list your professional online profiles too (LinkedIn, Twitter, etc.) to give yourself a great boost as a candidate.

4. Consider A Functional Resume

One more thing to consider is creating a functional resume that doesn't list the years of your accomplishments but instead focuses on the accomplishments alone. Some employers see functional resumes as red flags for gaps in employment or other issues, however, so take the time to be thorough if you choose to take this route. As a seasoned professional with many years of experience under your belt, it's important you help employers to focus less on your age and more on your talents and capabilities. There's no doubt you can get the job done. Now, show the employer just how capable you are! This post was originally published on an earlier date.

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About the author

Jessica Holbrook Hernandez, CEO of Great Resumes Fast is an expert resume writer, career and personal branding strategist, author, and presenter. Want to work with the best resume writer? If you would like us to personally work on your resume, cover letter, or LinkedIn profile—and dramatically improve their response rates—then check out our professional and executive resume writing services at GreatResumesFast.com or contact us for more information if you have any questions. Disclosure: This post is sponsored by a CAREEREALISM-approved expert.
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I recently worked on a pro bono project for a friend, and it reminded me of a time early in my career and how lucky I was then to get such great advice from the more seasoned pros around me. Advice that ultimately saved me from some major pitfalls. I made mistakes here and there over the course of nearly 20 years of projects, but with each hiccup came a lesson. Here are some takeaways from my lessons learned and all that sage advice.

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