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Recruiters can be a big part of a successful job search strategy, but you need to know the rules. Especially when it comes to your resume. The first thing you need to understand is recruiters are paid by the employer, and their loyalty is to them. It is not true recruiters find jobs for people - they find people for jobs. It is crucial you understand this important part because many people just call recruiters and expect help in their job search. With that in mind, you should determine if recruiters work at your level. Recruiters typically receive 20-30% of the annual compensation for the position which means for a $75,000 job, a recruiter will get between $15,000 and $22,500 if a company hires the person they present. This means they will only put in front of their clients people who are worth those kinds of fees. They look for the "best-fit" candidates, one who meet most - if not all - of the employer's requirements. For you, that means if you have no experience in the kind of position they are trying to fill, it is unlikely they will consider you. If you are a recent graduate with less than two years of experience, it is also unlikely a company would want to pay those fees for someone who is so easy to find through regular job advertising. A good way to see if you are the kind of person recruiters want is to look at the ads on Indeed.com for your job title. See if they are posted by employers or recruiters. Although that is not an acid test, it is certainly a good indicator if you fit in the category of those people a recruiter would seek. Watch this quick video to learn a little more about what a recruiter looks for on a candidate's resume.

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