3 Ways To Include Testimonials On Your Resume

We all know that the resume is written to market a job candidate’s capabilities – it’s a self-promotional piece. So how much credibility does the document actually lend? Who’s to say what’s factual and what’s hype? Related: 5 Tips For Formatting Your Resume For Easy Reading At the initial stages of resume review, employers simply have to take the job candidate’s word for it. They may base it on the candidate’s ability to demonstrate accomplishments and successes on the job as well as the inclusion of quantifiable and qualified results. But for resumes that are really looking to have impact and win employers over for a phone call back, they will also include testimonials. By adding testimonials, a candidate has third party support backing up the information on the resume. It’s similar to the process employers will take later in the interview process to speak with referrals to confirm a candidate’s experiences and capabilities are what they say they are.


3 Ways To Include Testimonials On Your Resume

There are different ways to include testimonials on your resume for greater impact:

1. Add A Testimonials Section

Similar to how a resume may have a section for Profile Summary, Work Experience, and Education, add a Testimonials section for a bullet point list of 2-3 testimonials to support the case that you are the best candidate for the job.

2. Incorporate Into Your Work Experience

Under the section for Work Experience where detail is provided to indicate successes and accomplishments on the job with each employer, add a testimonial from a supervisor or client in italics and offset it from the general summary by centering the quote. Appropriate testimonials of this kind may be found in performance reviews, reference letters, thank you notices via email or informal notes, and recommendations from LinkedIn.

3. Include It As A Filler To Other Appropriate Sections

Testimonials can enhance a resume when it’s included in a suitable section to what subject matter is discussed. For instance, if the testimonial is about a candidate’s web design skills, it may make sense to include it to the section detailing technical capabilities. It’s important to remember to treat testimonials like references. Don’t throw out 10 testimonials on the resume. Most employers may only ask for 2-3 references, so apply that same rule for testimonials on the resume. You should also stick to using only what is relevant. It serves little purpose to include a testimonial that speaks of event planning skills when the job applied for is for work in the area of nursing.

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About the author

Don Goodman’s firm was rated as the #1 Resume Writing Service in 2013, 2014, and 2015. Don is a triple-certified, nationally recognized Expert Resume Writer, Career Management Coach and Job Search Strategist who has helped thousands of people secure their next job. Check out his Resume Writing Service. Get a Free Resume Evaluation or call him at 800.909.0109 for more information. Disclosure: This post is sponsored by a CAREEREALISM-approved expert. You can learn more about expert posts here. Photo Credit: Shutterstock

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