Recruiter Reveals 7 Salary Negotiation Strategies

The way you present your requests during a salary negotiation has a dramatic impact on whether you get what you want from an employer. Be firm, but flexible, self-confident, but not arrogant or demanding, and sell your skills and knowledge in a way that appeals to the employer’s concern about the bottom line. Here are seven great salary negotiation strategies that can help you get the salary you deserve when dealing with recruiters.


Salary Negotiation Strategies

Let me give you a few salary negotiation strategies to help you get your biggest paycheck yet...

1. Be Enthusiastic, Polite, And Professional

Let the employer know by your tone of voice and your demeanor that your goal is a win-win solution. If you are too pushy or adopt a “take-it-or-leave-it” attitude, the employer may get the impression that you’re not that interested in the job and withdraw the offer.

2. Start High And Work Toward A Middle Ground

Ask for a little more than you think the employer wants to pay and then negotiate a middle ground between the employer’s first offer and your counter-proposal.

3. Be Creative

Look beyond base salary for ways to boost your income. For example:
  • Holiday days. If new employees must work for 6 to 12 months before receiving paid holidays, ask that this restriction be waived.
  • Early salary review.
  • Bonuses. In addition to requesting a sign-on bonus, you may be able to negotiate a performance bonus.

4. Continue Selling Yourself

As you negotiate, remind the employer how the company will benefit from your services. Let’s say, for example, that the employer balks at giving you $8,000 more in compensation. Explain how you will recoup that amount and more for the company. For instance:
“I realize you have a budget to worry about. However, remember that with the desktop publishing skills I bring to the position, you won’t have to hire outside vendors to produce our monthly customer newsletter and other publications. That alone should produce far more than $8,000 in savings a year.”
In other words, justify every additional money or benefit you request. Remember to do so by focusing on the employer’s needs, not yours.

5. Ask A Fair Price

Be sure that your requests are reasonable and in line with the current marketplace. If the salary offer is below market value, gently suggest that it’s in the company’s best interest to pay the going rate:
“The research that I’ve done indicates that the going rate for a position such as this is $5,000 higher than this offer. Although I’d really like to work for you, I can’t justify doing so for less than market value. I think if you reevaluate the position and consider its importance to your bottom line, you’ll agree that it’s worth paying market price to get someone who can really make an impact.”

6. Be A Confident Negotiator

Remember to use the confident body language and speech patterns. When you make a salary request, don’t go on and on, stating over the over again why it’s justified. Make your request and offer a short, simple explanation of why that amount is appropriate.

7. Let The Employer Win, Too

It’s a smart negotiating strategy to ask for a few benefits or perks you don’t want that badly. Then you can ‘give in’ and agree to take the job without those added benefits it the employer meets all of your other requests. Ideally, both parties in a negotiation should come away from the table feeling that they’ve won. This is especially true when you’re dealing with salary negotiations. You want employers to have good feelings about the price paid for your services so that your working relationship begins on a positive note.  

About the author

Margaret Buj is an interview coach who has been helping professionals get hired, promoted and paid more for over eight years. She is also a qualified Personal Performance & Corporate and Executive Coach and can help you with developing confidence and the attitude that will make it easier for you to get any job you want. Schedule a complimentary consultation with Margaret here.   Disclosure: This post is sponsored by a Work It Daily-approved expert. You can learn more about expert posts here.

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