Why Strong Executive Brands Get More Peer Respect

A recent Fast Company article outlines the most productive way busy executives can leverage social networks. In short, it discusses the importance of selecting the right peer networks to participate in, stating when done right, being a part of a peer network is the best way to study new trends and makes the process of learning what executives need to know to stay relevant and at the top of their game much easier. For me, the question becomes this: How can executives ensure they get into the best peer networks and connect with the top people in their industry?


Good Executive Branding = Better Credibility and More Respect

Any Chief Marketing Officer of a quality, expensive product or service will tell you success lies in the strength of the brand. The more people admire it, the more credibility, respect, and most importantly, sales they acquire. The same applies to an executive’s brand. The better it is, the more credibility and respect they’ll enjoy amongst their peers. More importantly, the more doors to career opportunities get opened as well. Here’s why... In networking there is a saying, “It’s not who you know - it’s who knows you!” When you are well known for your executive brand, your peers will want to recommend you for jobs and facilitate introductions as a way to align themselves with you professionally. In fact, if they see your brand as stronger and far more powerful than their own, they’ll be even more eager to help you because they see it as a way to "pay it forward" in hopes of having the favor returned some day.

Executive Branding + Selective Peer Networking = Best Career Opportunities

When it comes to Executive Branding and peer networking, one needs the other. Having the best marketing for your business-of-one means nothing if you have no place to market it, while networking furiously in peer groups without a strong marketing message for your business-of-one leads to a lot of wasted interactions. You must do both if you want to identify and secure the best possible career opportunity in the executive suite.

What’s the First Step to Getting Started?

Opt in on the next page for my FREE e-guide, “4 Ways Executives Are Using Social Media for Professional Branding." In it, I showcase four executives who are leveraging the most popular social media tools for effective Executive Branding campaigns. Strong executive brands image from Shutterstock

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