The Rule Of Three: How To Be Unforgettable To Employers

The Rule Of Three: How To Be Unforgettable To Employers

Want to know how you can be unforgettable to employers? The answer is the "rule of three." Related: 3 Great Activities To Keep Your Job Search Moving Whether you're giving a presentation, telling a story, submitting a proposal or selling your services - keep in mind the "Rule of Three." Have you ever noticed the pattern of "3" in many of our traditional childhood stories -- three blind mice, the three stooges, the three little pigs, Goldilocks' three bears, three wishes... the list goes on and on. Research has shown there is a rationale behind the use of "three" in our societal storytelling - our brains tend to naturally think in threes. Add one more element and the memory pattern tends to slip. Why not take advantage of this human tendency when interacting with others? Knowing the "Rule of Three" and using it in your presentations, your "elevator pitch," your cover letter, your letter to that important client, and other key communication pieces can be incredibly impactful. Use the "Rule of Three," and people will tend to remember what you said and will likely remember YOU said it. As you wrestle with formulating your very next presentation, pick three stories, three key points or three ideas that best illustrate the message you are attempting to convey. Repeat those three elements throughout your presentation. End your presentation by going back to those three elements. The "Rule of Three" works and is a powerful tool for facilitating retention. This post was originally published at an earlier date.


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