How To Write A Job Acceptance Letter

A job acceptance letter is a formal way to show your consent for a job offer. However, it must not be done in a casual way. Related: How To Decline A Job Offer It involves a thorough review of the salary and benefits offered by the employer. After you are fully satisfied with the compensation package, only then should you send an acceptance letter to the employer. A hastily-made decision because you are too excited to receive an offer could put you in a position you regret later.


How To Write A Job Acceptance Letter

After you make up your mind about what the company is offering, follow these tips on how to write a job acceptance letter:

Show Your Gratitude

Start your letter off by thanking the company that offered you the opportunity. Convey your gratitude for their offer and express your desire to join the team and contribute to the growth of the company. If there is anything that you discussed thoroughly during the interview, you can allude to it in your acceptance letter to show you are dedicated and were paying attention, both of which are important for succeeding in any job.

Reiterate The Terms

Remind the employer about the exact terms mentioned for the job, so that the conversation can remain clear. Include the basic salary, overtime, health insurance, paid leaves and contract type (if applicable), and any other things that were negotiated during the final interview. If you feel it looks out of place in the body of your letter, then write it on a separate page and attach it to the letter.

Indicate Your Starting Date And Location

Indicate the exact date that you will be joining the company. If there are multiple offices near you, specify which location you'll be working at in the letter. This will rule out any confusion you have regarding the time or whereabouts of your position.

Learn About Training Sessions You May Need

If your job involves preliminary training sessions, tell the employer how much you look forward to it. State your desire for any suggestions from the company on how you can improve as a professional so you can do an even better job for the company. For example, if you are hired as a sales person, you may be accompanied by someone else during your initial dealings with customers.

Provide Contact Information

Be sure to provide your contact details in the letter, including both your personal and home numbers along with your email address. Remember not to give your personal email to the companies and rather set up a separate email account for official dealings. Organize your email account with separate files and folders where you can arrange files in a systemic way. By having your information on the letter, anybody that needs to contact you can do so, even if they don't have other documents of yours.

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