How To Write A Resume To Move To A Higher Position

Many people feel they have the experience and credentials to move to the next higher position. If that’s you, then your resume needs to communicate that you have the experience and skills to meet that challenge. Related: Special Grammar Rules For Resumes Here are several tips to help you craft a resume that demonstrates you are ready for a higher level position:


Understand what the employer is seeking.

You need to convince an employer you are qualified for the higher position so make absolutely sure you know their job requirements. They will generally be looking for years of experience and proof statements regarding your capabilities. For example, you are a sales professional with over 10 years of experience and you want to move to a sales manager role. An employer wants someone who can motivate and train sales teams to meet quotas. Mention how you have trained peers both informally or formally (led sessions at national sales meetings) and how you have consistently been top ranked for performance. The same goes for other professions. Illustrate how you are considered the senior person, have been selected for special projects or asked to train others, or document procedures.

Demonstrate specific work and initiatives.

It is important that you demonstrate the extent of your experience. The project manager who is looking to move to a program manager or middle manager role overseeing other project managers has to demonstrate they have the expertise and experience to do that. For example, there is a world of difference between a project manager who has completed five projects versus one that has led over 40 large-scale initiatives ranging from $2 million to $10 million. Remember, too, that titles vary depending on the size of a company, so a manager at GE can be an executive at a smaller firm.

Demonstrate you can solve the potential employer’s problems.

To fulfill a job, employers want to know you can handle the responsibilities and that you can solve problems that lie ahead with the job. To be convincing, demonstrate accomplishments where you helped solve similar issues or problems the employer may face. Remember, employers are looking for specific experience and will consider your potential based on past experience and accomplishments. Stick to a can-do attitude and craft a resume demonstrating your initiatives and accomplishments to make a convincing argument on your readiness for a higher position. Write a great resume in 15 minutes! This post was originally published at an earlier date.

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About the author

Don Goodman’s firm was rated as the #1 Resume Writing Service in 2013, 2014, and 2015. Don is a triple-certified, nationally recognized Expert Resume Writer, Career Management Coach and Job Search Strategist who has helped thousands of people secure their next job. Check out his Resume Writing Service. Get a Free Resume Evaluation or call him at 800.909.0109 for more information. Disclosure: This post is sponsored by a CAREEREALISM-approved expert. You can learn more about expert posts here. Photo Credit: Shutterstock

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