5 Must-Read Resume Writing Tips

Is the thought of writing a resume as pleasant as having your wisdom teeth surgically extracted? I ask because I was discussing resume writing tips with a client today and she was thrilled I was going to write it for her. As she put it, she was no longer actively involved in the "whole torturous process." Related: 5 Things That Make Your Resume Stand Out In Today’s Job Market I didn't realize the experience could be so terrible - but then I thought about doing my own taxes and realized what she meant.


5 Must-Read Resume Writing Tips

Here are five must-read resume writing tips that will help you through the process:

1. Keep It Simple

Keep your resume simple yet filled with relevant information and keywords. Sell your skills, abilities, and accomplishments by showing how you are an excellent fit for the job. Remember, your resume is a marketing piece and it's supposed to generate enough interest to get you a telephone call from a prospective employer. It is your ticket into a telephone interview at the least, so it should make you shine!

2. Don't Cram

If you have more than five years of experience, it is not necessary for you to try to cram everything into a one page document. Two pages are perfectly acceptable and standard practice. Generally, you want to keep your resume at no more than two pages.

3. Show How You're The Solution

The employer has a pain, so to speak, so you need to show how you are the solution. Your resume should target the job for which you are applying. If you're applying for a job as a Research Scientist, tailor your resume toward the position. Go ahead and remove anything that isn't related. There's no need to mention a marketing internship on your Research Scientist resume because it's not relevant to the position.

4. Just List The Years

You don't need to use months and years on your resume; just use years. This will be especially helpful if you've held irrelevant jobs for less than a year because you don't have to mention them on your resume. For instance, if you were working part-time as a pottery instructor for seven or eight months, you don't need to add it to your Research Scientist resume. (A caveat: Don't forget to mention the job prior to a background check).

5. Show The Result First

For greater impact, mention the result first then describe how you achieved it. Take a look at this before and after. Before: Designed and implemented a research strategy that resulted in $30,000 in additional revenues each month. After: Generated $30,000 in additional monthly revenues by designing and implementing a high impact research strategy. Writing a resume does not have to be torture. These five tips will help you write a great resume and hopefully help you forget all about wisdom teeth extraction. This post was originally published at an earlier date.

Related Posts

15 Tips For Sprucing Up Your Resume In 30 Minutes Or Less The Worst Resume Advice I’ve EVER Heard Your Resume Is A Sales Document   Photo Credit: Shutterstock

In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if your co-worker took credit for the work you did...right in front of your colleagues AND boss!

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

SHOW MORE Show less

If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the awkward situation one of our viewers, Cam submitted. He's been working at a job for awhile, but recently overheard a hiring manager making fun of a candidate with autism right after an interview-not only awkward, but VERY unprofessional!

SHOW MORE Show less

In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if witnessed a hiring manager at your organization making fun of a candidate who they had just interviewed who had autism.

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

SHOW MORE Show less

Starting a family is one of the biggest milestones in a person's life. It's in those first few months when a parent can really bond with their newborn and make lifelong memories. However, for some new dads, it can be difficult to juggle being a new parent while remaining dedicated to their career.

Fortunately, some companies have generous paternity leave policies that give new dads the ability to take time off of work to stay home with their child.

SHOW MORE Show less

There are LOTS of questions around resume dos and don'ts. There's so much advice out there that it can be overwhelming to try and figure out what's the correct answer.

During our weekly live Office Hours on YouTube, two of our coaches, Ariella Coombs and J.T. O'Donnell, answer questions live from viewers related to their job search, career success, on the job situations and more.

We complied a simple list of what we find to be the most common questions our coaches get about resumes. We hope you find this helpful.

Let's start with the basics...

SHOW MORE Show less

Back in March, we made the hard decision to change our private Facebook group of over 37 THOUSAND members to a fee-based only platform.

SHOW MORE Show less

In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if a recruiter called you a day EARLY for your phone interview (and you were NOT PREPARED!)

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

SHOW MORE Show less

If you caught our last video in our latest series, "Well This Happened..." you heard about the problem one of our viewers is having with their co-worker. To recap, they have a colleague that overshares a little too much, and they weren't sure how to go about addressing this. We had some great responses from our viewers on how they think our friend should handle this. Check out the answer below and let us know if you guessed right or not!

SHOW MORE Show less

Negotiating salary can be a scary, intimidating experience. However, if you go in prepared, it doesn't have to be that way - you can confidently negotiate for a salary you deserve. But how?

SHOW MORE Show less