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6 Ways To Celebrate Valentine’s Day At Work

Man celebrates Valentine's Day at work
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While cupid's arrow shouldn't be aimed anywhere near the workplace, there is a fun and appropriate way to celebrate this holiday of love. Here are some great ideas to spread love, cheer, and perhaps some dessert in the office this Valentine's Day.


Some view this holiday as cringe-worthy, but there are a lot of positive ways to celebrate Valentine's Day that not only inspire your fellow co-workers but also do good in the community. Don't miss out on this opportunity to show your co-workers how much you appreciate them, and to lift spirits in the workplace, increase positivity, and foster a caring environment in the office.

Bring The Food, They Will Come

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Food is the fastest way to anyone's heart and there is no better way to become the office hero than to bring in some tasty treats. Why not share the love by bringing in a special breakfast or planning a potluck dessert social hour?

Look for heart shaped bagels or pastries. Think pink and sprinkle in some candy hearts. Keep it healthy and bring in a fruit bouquet.

Bringing everyone together in the break room will give an opportunity to share a moment together, take a pause from work, and enjoy some tasty food. It is a delicious way to promote appreciation and increase morale in the workplace.

Spread The Love

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This holiday is a perfect opportunity to lead by example and do something really positive. One way is to fundraise for an office charitable donation. There are so many wonderful organizations that accept office donations. Pick your top choices and let your co-workers weigh in on where the funds should go.

Take it a step further and organize a volunteer day. Get a group of co-workers together and volunteer at a food bank or soup kitchen. Plant flowers and clean up a local park. It will not only encourage teamwork but will also have a positive impact on the local community.

Gratitude Valentines

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The act of gratitude in the workplace has many positives. From higher levels of job satisfaction and less stress to fewer sick days, the simple act of gratitude can work wonders.

Create an office whiteboard of positive messages. Allow employees to write secret messages of gratitude and display it in a highly visible spot such as the kitchen or lobby. Giving people the opportunity to show their appreciation improves employee engagement and is sure to make a lasting impression.

Random Acts of Kindness

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During the month of February we recognize the National Random Acts of Kindness Day. What better way to celebrate than to organize a random acts of kindness challenge in the office? It is scientifically proven that kindness has a positive effect on our health. It can reduce blood pressure, lower levels of physical pain, and decrease stress and depression.

Inspire your co-workers by organizing daily kindness challenges. Have a sign-up sheet for employees to commit to a daily act of kindness in the office. You will soon find that kindness is contagious and creates a stellar office culture.

Thank You Notes

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Most only think about thank you notes after an interview or receiving a gift, but the thank you note is a powerful tool that is often overlooked. Research shows that the recipient of a thank you note is happier and more engaged.

Use this holiday as a chance to distribute thank you notes throughout the office and encourage your colleagues to do the same.

Through our constant communication through email and social media, the power of the written word is a lost art form. By taking the time to put a few personable thoughts of thanks down on paper, it is an effective way to show your appreciation and spread happiness and cheer.

Heart Healthy

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February is American Heart Month. Valentine's Day is a perfect opportunity to throw a heart-healthy event. Bring in healthy foods and share informative tips on heart health. Perhaps even bring in an expert from the American Heart Association to lead a discussion on heart health.

Do you work in a competitive office? You could organize an office activity that will get the blood pumping such as a softball or kickball game. This is an excellent opportunity to put a focus on health and well-being in the workplace and institute habits in the office that promote good heart health.

There are lots of ways to celebrate Valentine's Day at work—you just have to get creative! Have some office fun this February by trying out the ideas above.


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