10 Tips For Success At Job Fairs

Recently, I attended a local job fair and spoke to several of the employers to solicit their response to the following question: "If you were to offer one tip for job seekers attending a job fair, what would it be?" The two answers given most frequently? "Dress professionally" and "Communicate what you want and what you have to offer.” This seemed like common sense to me, but considering how many employers mentioned these two things, it occurred to me maybe it goes beyond common sense and falls into the category of "you don't know what you don't know.”


Job Fair Tips

So, for those who don’t know, here are ten valuable tips to help job seekers find success at job fairs.

1. Dress Professionally

The general rule of thumb is to dress to fit the job for which you are applying. For some, this may mean a suit and tie; for others a pair of khakis, polo shirt, or button-down collar. It’s not okay to “pop in” to a job fair on your way home from the gym or to the grocery store. Plan your attire carefully. Choose a color that accentuates your best features and make sure it is comfortable. Sneakers and flip flops are never acceptable.

2. Communicate What You Want And What You Have To Offer

Employers are amazed at how many people attend job fairs hoping the employer will play the role of a career counselor or engage in a game of "20 Questions.” Prior to attending a job fair, prepare a 30-second introduction and career overview: your "positioning statement.” Include the following:
  • The kind of work you do
  • The number of years of experience you have and in what industry(ies)
  • Some of your areas of expertise and/or key skills
  • What you hope to find in your next job
Write it down and practice it until it rolls off your tongue and feels comfortable.

3. Know What The Company Does

Call the sponsor(s) of the job fair, find out which companies will be there and do some advance research. What is their product or service? Who are the customers they serve? What kinds of positions exist within the company? What skills are they looking for? Find out which employers are the best match for your skills and experience and target them before you arrive.

4. Plan Who You Want To Talk To And In What Order

You probably will not have time to talk to everyone. Look over your research notes and decide in advance which companies would be the best match for your skills and experience. Plan to visit the "maybe" companies first and save the really important ones for last. This way you can work through some of your nervousness before you present yourself to the companies that really matter.

5. Bring Your Resume

You should bring sufficient copies of your resume (printed on high-quality bond paper) for the employers you plan to target. Make sure your resume is targeted to the kind of job you are seeking, focuses on accomplishments, not responsibilities, and is two pages or less. Several employers I spoke to mentioned receiving resumes that were as long as five to ten pages! Do not fold your resume or place it in an envelope!

6. Ask Questions

The main purpose of attending a job fair is to gather information. What do employers look for in an employee? What are some of the current challenges they are facing? What kinds of positions exist within the company? How do they screen and make their hiring decisions? If you attend a job fair hoping to walk away with a job offer, you will probably be disappointed. If you attend to gather information, you will always walk away a winner! One word of caution: this is not the time or place to ask, "What do you pay?” or "What are your benefits?” These topics are best discussed when an offer has been made or is pending.

7. Be Aware Of Proper Etiquette

From the moment you enter the job fair, you're "on stage.” Don't smoke or chew gum. If there are refreshments, save them until you are ready to leave. Don’t bad mouth your current or last employer. (When one employer asked a job seeker why they were looking for work, they were shocked when the job seeker answered "Because <employer name> is a real #! @".) Give a firm and confident handshake. Smile. Make eye contact. Turn off your cell phone. Don't monopolize the employer's time.

8. Make Your Objectives Known

Employer's report many attendees seem to be "just browsing" or are there to collect the free promotional items. Approach employers confidently. Introduce yourself and express why you are there. Ask questions and take notes. Express more interest in the company literature than the key rings, post-it notes, and candy bars.

9. Collect Business Cards And Take Notes

Jot down notes while the employer is talking with you. Ask for the business card of everyone you speak with. After leaving the employer's table, make notes of what you spoke about and what follow-up actions you need to take after the fair.

10. Follow Up

Send a thank-you letter within 24 hours to each employer you talked to at the fair. Remind them of which position(s) you spoke about and stress your interest in scheduling a follow-up interview. It might also be a good idea to enclose another copy of your resume or a personal business card (not one from your current employer) that will remind them of your skills and provide them with contact information. Keep these three objectives in mind as you go through the day: you are there to network, gather information, and solicit an invitation to an interview. Try to relax and be yourself. Employer's hire people they like. Focus on being likable and you can't loose at a job fair! Photo Credit: Shutterstock

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